Catalogue


A republic, if you can keep it : the foundation of the American presidency, 1700-1800 /
Michael P. Riccards.
imprint
New York : Greenwood Press, 1987.
description
xv, 227 p. ; 25 cm. --
ISBN
0313254621 (lib. bdg. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Greenwood Press, 1987.
isbn
0313254621 (lib. bdg. : alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
3479572
 
Bibliography: p. [201]-221.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1987-10:
Riccards (president, St. Johns College, N.M.) has written a unique account of the creation of and early experience with the US presidency. The author first explores the English and colonial experience that was relevant to structuring executive authority at the constitutional convention (as well as the theories supporting this experience). He then turns to familiar subjects-the decision-making in Philadelphia that led to a presidency and the role of the executive article in the ratification debate. All this is accomplished with clarity and economy of writing. The longer second part of the book is an analysis of George Washington's presidency, showing that Washington followed a federalist or strong executive model. Several brief chapters discuss the man and his popularity among the American people, the condition of the executive and bureaucracy before Washington became president, and events and policies that occupied the first president. The last chapter is an epilogue that all too briefly sets the Washington presidency in comparative and historical context. Although it has an unfinished quality, the book is a useful contribution to presidential scholarship. Brief bibliographical essay. Academic readers.-C.O. Jones, University of Virginia
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œRiccards has written a unique account of the creation of and early experience with the US presidency. The author first explores the English and colonial experience that was relevant to structuring executive authority at the constitutional convention (as well as the theories supporting this experience). He then turns to familiar subjects--the decision-making in Philadelphia that led to a presidency and the role of the executive article in the ratification debate. All this is accomplished with clarity and economy of writing. The longer second part of the book is an analysis of George Washington's presidency, showing that Washington followed a federalist or strong executive model. Several brief chapters discuss the man and his popularity among the American people, the condition of the executive and bureaucracy before Washington became president, and events and policies that occupied the first president. The last chapter is an epilogue that all too briefly sets the Washington presidency in comparative and historical context.... The book is a useful contribution to presidential scholarship. Brief bibliographical essay. Academic readers.'' Choice
'œThis brief work covers the origins of the American presidency as it evolved in the first dozen years of the national experience.... While this book is no doubt meant as an introduction to the institution of the presidency, it may be just as valuable for its brief but balanced and complete presentation of the major issues of the 1790s. The author does not present any significant new ideas, but he has done a good job of mastering primary and secondary resources. This book can be a valuable complement to the many new scholarly and popular books on the Constitution that are currently flooding the market.'' Perspective
'œMichael Riccards begins his well organized and clearly written essay with chapters on "The Royal Perogative," "The Provincial Governors," and "The War Governers," introducing the kinds of executive leadership with which Americans were familiar on the eve of the Constitutional Convention of 1787. The general reader will find this introduction helpful . . . A Republic If You Can Keep It concludes with a useful guide to further reading and a valuable observation on American statecraft at the close of the eighteenth century. . . .'' Presidential Studies Quarterly
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1987
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
"Riccards has written a unique account of the creation of and early experience with the US presidency. The author first explores the English and colonial experience that was relevant to structuring executive authority at the constitutional convention (as well as the theories supporting this experience). He then turns to familiar subjects--the decision-making in Philadelphia that led to a presidency and the role of the executive article in the ratification debate. All this is accomplished with clarity and economy of writing. The longer second part of the book is an analysis of George Washington's presidency, showing that Washington followed a federalist or strong executive model. Several brief chapters discuss the man and his popularity among the American people, the condition of the executive and bureaucracy before Washington became president, and events and policies that occupied the first president. The last chapter is an epilogue that all too briefly sets the Washington presidency in comparative and historical context. . . . The book is a useful contribution to presidential scholarship." Choice
Long Description
Riccards has written a unique account of the creation of and early experience with the US presidency. The author first explores the English and colonial experience that was relevant to structuring executive authority at the constitutional convention (as well as the theories supporting this experience). He then turns to familiar subjects--the decision-making in Philadelphia that led to a presidency and the role of the executive article in the ratification debate. All this is accomplished with clarity and economy of writing. The longer second part of the book is an analysis of George Washington's presidency, showing that Washington followed a federalist or strong executive model. Several brief chapters discuss the man and his popularity among the American people, the condition of the executive and bureaucracy before Washington became president, and events and policies that occupied the first president. The last chapter is an epilogue that all too briefly sets the Washington presidency in comparative and historical context. . . . The book is a useful contribution to presidential scholarship. Choice
Table of Contents
The Origins of Executive Authority
The Uncertain Heritage
The Royal Perogative
The Provincial Governors
The War Governors Creating the Presidency
The Ratification Controversy
The Washington Administration
The Authentic American Cincinnatus Returns
The Grand Procession
The First Inaugeration
The Presidents Before Washington
The Bureaucracy Before Washington
The Removal Date His Highness, the Presidency
The Debt Assumption Deal
The Establishment of the Bank Washington as an Administrator
The Tribes and the Long Knives Fathering the Parties A Falling Out of Sons
The Fires of Factionalism Towards Neutrality
The Whiskey Insurrection
The Jay Treaty Troubles in the House--1796 French Ire to the End, 1796-97 Washington as Legend
Epilogue
Bibliographical Essay
Notes
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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