Catalogue


The man who mistook his wife for a hat and other clinical tales /
Oliver Sacks.
edition
1st Touchstone ed.
imprint
New York, NY : Simon & Schuster, 1998.
description
x, 243 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0684853949, 9780684853949
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Simon & Schuster, 1998.
isbn
0684853949
9780684853949
general note
"A Touchstone book."
catalogue key
3462598
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 234-243).
A Look Inside
About the Author
BIH Author Biography
Oliver Sacks was born in London and educated in London, Oxford, California, and New York. He is professor of clinical neurology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He is the author of many books, including Awakenings and A Leg to Stand On.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1985-12-13:
A neurologist who claims to be equally interested in disease and people, Sacks (Awakenings, etc.) explores neurological disorders with a novelist's skill and an appreciation of his patients as human beings. These cases, some of which have appeared in literary or medical publications, illustrate the tragedy of losing neurological facultiesmemory, powers of visualization, word-recognitionor the also-devastating fate of those suffering an excess of neurological functions causing such hyper states as chorea, tics, Tourette's syndrome and Parkinsonism. Still other patients experience organically based hallucinations, transports, visions, etc., usually deemed to be psychic in nature. The science of neurology, Sacks charges, stresses the abstract and computerized at the expense of judgment and emotional depthsin his view, the most important human qualities. Therapy for brain-damaged patients (by medication, accommodation, music or art) should, he asserts, be designed to help restore the essentially personal quality of the individual. First serial to New York Review of Books, The Sciences and Science; Reader's Subscription alternate. January (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 1986-02-15:
Neurologist Sacks, author of Awakenings and A Leg To Stand On , presents a series of clinical tales drawn from fascinating and unusual cases encountered during his years of medical practice. Dividing his text into four parts``losses'' of neurological function; ``excesses''; ``transports'' involving reminiscence, altered perception, and imagination; and ``the simple,'' or the world of the retardedSacks introduces the reader to real people who suffer from a variety of neurological syndromes which include symptoms such as amnesia, uncontrolled movements, and musical hallucinations. Sacks recounts their stories in a riveting, compassionate, and thoughtful manner. Written on a somewhat scholarly level, the book is highly recommended for larger collections. Debra Berlanstein, Towson State Univ. Lib., Baltimore (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Noel PerrinChicago Sun-TimesDr. Sacks's best book.... One sees a wise, compassionate and very literate mindat work in these 20 stories, nearly all remarkable, and many the kind that restore one's faith in humanity.
Noel Perrin Chicago Sun-Times Dr. Sacks's best book.... One sees a wise, compassionate and very literate mind at work in these 20 stories, nearly all remarkable, and many the kind that restore one's faith in humanity.
Noel Perrin Chicago Sun-Times Dr. Sacks's best book.... One sees a wise, compassionate and very literate mindat work in these 20 stories, nearly all remarkable, and many the kind that restore one's faith in humanity.
Clarence E. OlsenSt. Louis Post-DispatchA provocative introduction to the marvels of the human mind...
Clarence E. Olsen St. Louis Post-Dispatch A provocative introduction to the marvels of the human mind...
New York MagazineDr. Sacks's most absorbing book.... His tales are so compelling that many ofthem serve as eerie metaphors not only for the condition of modern medicinebut of modern man.
New York Magazine Dr. Sacks's most absorbing book.... His tales are so compelling that many of them serve as eerie metaphors not only for the condition of modern medicine but of modern man.
New York Magazine Dr. Sacks's most absorbing book.... His tales are so compelling that many ofthem serve as eerie metaphors not only for the condition of modern medicinebut of modern man.
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews, February 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In his most extraordinary book, "one of the great clinical writers of the 20th century" (The New York Times) recounts the case histories of patients lost in the bizarre, apparently inescapable world of neurological disorders. Oliver Sacks's The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat tells the stories of individuals afflicted with fantastic perceptual and intellectual aberrations: patients who have lost their memories and with them the greater part of their pasts; who are no longer able to recognize people and common objects; who are stricken with violent tics and grimaces or who shout involuntary obscenities; whose limbs have become alien; who have been dismissed as retarded yet are gifted with uncanny artistic or mathematical talents. If inconceivably strange, these brilliant tales remain, in Dr. Sacks's splendid and sympathetic telling, deeply human. They are studies of life struggling against incredible adversity, and they enable us to enter the world of the neurologically impaired, to imagine with our hearts what it must be to live and feel as they do. A great healer, Sacks never loses sight of medicine's ultimate responsibility: "the suffering, afflicted, fighting human subject."
Long Description
In his most extraordinary book, "one of the great clinical writers of the 20th century"(The New York Times)recounts the case histories of patients lost in the bizarre, apparently inescapable world of neurological disorders. Oliver Sacks'sThe Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hattells the stories of individuals afflicted with fantastic perceptual and intellectual aberrations: patients who have lost their memories and with them the greater part of their pasts; who are no longer able to recognize people and common objects; who are stricken with violent tics and grimaces or who shout involuntary obscenities; whose limbs have become alien; who have been dismissed as retarded yet are gifted with uncanny artistic or mathematical talents.If inconceivably strange, these brilliant tales remain, in Dr. Sacks's splendid and sympathetic telling, deeply human. They are studies of life struggling against incredible adversity, and they enable us to enter the world of the neurologically impaired, to imagine with our hearts what it must be to live and feel as they do. A great healer, Sacks never loses sight of medicine's ultimate responsibility: "the suffering, afflicted, fighting human subject."
Table of Contents
Preface
Losses
Introduction
The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat
The Lost Mariner
The Disembodied Lady
The Man Who Fell out of Bed
Hands
Phantoms
On the Level
Eyes Right!
The President's Speech
Excesses
Introduction
Witty Ticcy Ray
Cupid's Disease
A Matter of Identity
Yes, Father-Sister
The Possessed page
Transports
Introduction
Reminiscence
Incontinent Nostalgia
A Passage to India
The Dog Beneath the Skin
Murder
The Visions of Hildegard
The World of the Simple
Introduction
Rebecca
A Walking Grove
The Twins
The Autist Artist
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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