Catalogue


Borderlander : the life of James Kirker, 1793-1852 /
Ralph Adam Smith.
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c1999.
description
ix, 326 p. : maps
ISBN
0806130415 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c1999.
isbn
0806130415 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3460576
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ralph Adam Smith was Emeritus Professor of History at Abilene Christian University, Texas.
Summaries
Main Description
James Kirker, "Indian fighter," is among the most infamous characters of the American West. In his exhaustively researched biography, Ralph Adam Smith explores the controversy surrounding the life of this frontier figure.
Main Description
James Kirker, "Indian fighter," is among the most infamous characters of the American West. In his exhaustively researched biography, Ralph Adam Smith explores the controversy surrounding the life of this frontier figure. Kirker emigrated from Ireland to New York City in 1810. In the years that followed, he was a privateer (in the War of 1812), a British captive, a merchant, a mountain man, the head of a private army, and a dominant figure in New Mexico politics. When Apache and Comanche Indians from the United States began raiding frequently in northern Mexico, the Mexican government, in desperation, turned to bounty warfare, signing five contracts with "Don Santiago" Kirker to defend the borderland region. He became known throughout the West for his "effective and inexpensive" methods of killing Indians.
Unpaid Annotation
James Kirker, "Indian fighter, " is among the most infamous characters of the American West. In his exhaustively researched biography, Ralph Adam Smith explores the controversy surrounding the life of this frontier figure.Kirker emigrated from Ireland to New York City in 1810. In the years that followed, he was a privateer (in the War of 1812), a British captive, a merchant, a mountain man, the head of a private army, and a dominant figure in New Mexico politics.When Apache and Comanche Indians from the United States began raiding frequently in northern Mexico, the Mexican government, in desperation, turned to bounty warfare, signing five contracts with "Don Santiago" Kirker to defend the borderland region. He became known throughout the West for his "effective and inexpensive" methods of killing Indians.Since the 1920s, American historians have presented Kirker only in the worst of terms. Smith, however, demonstrates that Kirker's white contemporaries judged him a hero. At a time when evolving politics led to new methods of warfare -- when desperate people resorted to desperate measures -- his deeds earned him a reputation for bravery and good citizenship.
Table of Contents
List of Mapsp. vii
Prefacep. ix
From Borderland to Borderlandp. 3
In the Rocky Mountains and the Mexican Borderlandsp. 17
"Warfare against Everything That Bore the Name of Mexican"p. 40
Don Santiagop. 54
Exile and Returnp. 66
"War unto the Death of the Apaches"p. 83
"Mr. Kirker's War"p. 97
"Constantly Warring against the Apaches"p. 118
The Dark Yearsp. 134
"The Terror of the Apaches"p. 149
"The Terror of the Chihuahuans"p. 172
"Celebrated for His Feats of Daring"p. 188
Known throughout the Westp. 203
Closing the Circlep. 218
Last Days and Afterp. 235
Notesp. 251
Bibliographyp. 303
Indexp. 319
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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