Catalogue


Hemingway and the natural world /
edited by Robert E. Fleming.
imprint
Moscow : University of Idaho Press, c1999.
description
ix, 269 p. : ill.
ISBN
0893012149 (hard cover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Moscow : University of Idaho Press, c1999.
isbn
0893012149 (hard cover)
catalogue key
3460383
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Robert E. Fleming is Professor Emeritus in the Department of English Language and Literature at the University of New Mexico.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-06:
Its quirky, backwards-looking index notwithstanding, this volume commands attention for the range and substance of its essays, the results of a monumental conference in Sun Valley and Ketchum, Idaho, in 1996. This title calls to mind a predecessor, conference-based volume on similar concerns, Steinbeck and the Environment, ed. by Susan Beegel, Susan Shillinglaw, and Wesley Tiffney (CH, Jun'97). Both Hemingway and Steinbeck are at the forefront of any list of US writers expressing ecological concerns, though Hemingway's involvement was more than a bit conflicted, or "complicated," as Terry Tempest Williams puts it in her lyrical and highly personal keynote essay to the present volume. Given the sometimes chancy nature of such ventures, this reviewer considers this collection an especial success--in spite of the necessity of trotting out the predictable term "uneven." Readers will find much new information here, and the anthology winds down, appropriately enough, with a piece on the gradual emergence of the truth about Hemingway's suicide, which took place not far from the conference venues. The ongoing interest in many of the subjects discussed here make this volume useful for academic collections at all levels. J. M. Ditsky; University of Windsor
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2000
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Summaries
Main Description
This collection, the first consolidated effort to study Hemingway's relationship to the natural world, is essential for everyone interested not only in a key figure of twentieth century American literature, but also in the vital inheritance he bequeathed to a world whose own relationship to nature is increasingly conflicted.
Unpaid Annotation
This groundbreaking essay collection is the first consolidated effort to study Hemingway's relationship to the natural world.
Main Description
Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for the University of Idaho Press This collection, the first consolidated effort to study Hemingway's relationship to the natural world, is essential for everyone interested not only in a key figure of twentieth century American literature, but also in the vital inheritance he bequeathed to a world whose own relationship to nature is increasingly conflicted.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
"Hemingway and the Natural World," Keynote Address, Seventh International Hemingway Conferencep. 7
Whose Nature?: Differing Narrative Perspectives in Hemingway's "Big Two-Hearted River"p. 19
Man Cannot Live by Dry Flies Alone: Fly Rods, Grasshoppers, and an Adaptive Catholicity in Hemingway's "Big Two-Hearted River"p. 31
Hemingway's Use of a Natural Resource: Indiansp. 45
Roosevelt and Hemingway: Natural History, Manliness, and the Rhetoric of the Strenuous Lifep. 55
Shadow Rider: The Hemingway Hero as Western Archetypep. 69
Hemingway's Constructed Africa: Green Hills of Africa and the Conventions of Colonial Sporting Booksp. 87
Memory, Grief, and the Terrain of Desire: Hemingway's Green Hills of Africap. 99
"The African Book": Hemingway Major and Late in the Natural Worldp. 111
Dead Rabbits, Bad Milk, and Lost Eggs: Women, Nature, and Myth in For Whom the Bell Tollsp. 125
Shifting Orders: Chaos and Order in For Whom the Bell Tollsp. 139
Moving Earth: Ecofeminist Sites in Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls and Gellhorn's A Stricken Fieldp. 153
Hemingway's Gentle Hunters: Contradiction or Duality?p. 165
Hemingway's Late Life Relationship with Birdsp. 175
Bird Hunting and Male Bonding in Hemingway's Fiction and Familyp. 189
Freedom and Motion, Place and Placelessness: On the Road in Hemingway's Americap. 203
Vardis Fisher: Ernest Hemingway's Stern Idaho Criticp. 221
Dateline Sun Valley: The Press Coverage of the Death of Ernest Hemingwayp. 241
Contributorsp. 257
Indexp. 261
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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