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Harvard University Press : a history /
Max Hall.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1986.
description
257 p. : ill., ports. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0674380800 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1986.
isbn
0674380800 (alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
3455480
 
Bibliography: p. [205]-240.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1986-03-01:
Although the official founding of the Harvard University Press did not come until 1913, this history shows that there were antecedents at Harvard dating back to 1638. Concentrating on the period from 1913 through 1972, however, Hall, editor for the social sciences from 1960 to 1973, traces the press's ancestry, founding, important figures, and events. As Hall points out, the history of the Harvard University Press reflects the history of Harvard itself. Those interested in 20th-century books, moreover, will enjoy reading about the genesis of many important works at Harvard. Hall writes interestingly and well. His discussion of books, publishing economics, and personalities is well balanced. For larger collections. Larry Earl Bone, Mercy Coll. Lib., Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, March 1986
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Summaries
Main Description
A university press is a curious institution, dedicated to the dissemination of learning yet apart from the academic structure; a publishing firm that is in business, but not to make money; an arm of the university that is frequently misunderstood and occasionally attacked by faculty and administration. Max Hall here chronicles the early stages and first sixty years of Harvard University Press in a rich and entertaining book that is at once Harvard history, publishing history, printing history, business history, and intellectual history. The tale begins in 1638 when the first printing press arrived in British North America. It became the property of Harvard College and remained so for nearly half a century. Hall sketches the various forerunners of the "real" Harvard University Press, founded in 1913, and then follows the ups and downs of its first six decades, during which the Press published steadily if not always serenely a total of 4,500 books. He describes the directors and others who left their stamp on the Press or guided its fortunes during these years. And he gives the stories behind such enduring works as Lovejoy's Great Chain of Being, Giedion's Space, Time, and Architecture, Langer's Philosophy in a New Key, and Kelly's Eleanor of Aquitaine and the Four Kings.
Main Description
A university press is a curious institution, dedicated to the dissemination of learning yet apart from the academic structure; a publishing firm that is in business, but not to make money; an arm of the university that is frequently misunderstood and occasionally attacked by faculty and administration. Max Hall here chronicles the early stages and first sixty years of Harvard University Press in a rich and entertaining book that is at once Harvard history, publishing history, printing history, business history, and intellectual history. The tale begins in 1638 when the first printing press arrived in British North America. It became the property of Harvard College and remained so for nearly half a century. Hall sketches the various forerunners of the "real" Harvard University Press, founded in 1913, and then follows the ups and downs of its first six decades, during which the Press published steadily if not always serenely a total of 4,500 books. He describes the directors and others who left their stamp on the Press or guided its fortunes during these years. And he gives the stories behind such enduring works as Lovejoy's Great Chain of Being , Giedion's Space, Time, and Architecture , Langer's Philosophy in a New Key , and Kelly's Eleanor of Aquitaine and the Four Kings .
Table of Contents
Introduction: A University and Its Publishing House
Antecedents and Founding
First Steps under C. C. Lane, 1913-1919
The Murdock Years, 1910-1934
Malone and a Wider Audience, 1935-1943
Wartime Shock
Scaife and Survival, 1943-1947
Wilson and the Rise of the Press, 1947-1967
The Paperback Question, the Double Helix, and Other Stories
Crisis and Reorganization, 1968-1972
Notes Sources and Acknowledgments
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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