Catalogue


The making of geology : earth science in Britain, 1660-1815 /
Roy Porter.
imprint
Cambridge [Eng.] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1977.
description
x, 288 p.
ISBN
0521215218
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Eng.] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1977.
isbn
0521215218
catalogue key
3452950
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Levere, Trevor. 2007/09/07.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [239]-278) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Between the mid-seventeenth century and the early nineteenth century there developed in Britain a range of empirical and increasingly secular sciences concerned with the earth. This book presents a detailed account of how this development led to the creation of a complex socio-intellectual fabric of methods, ambitions, facts and ideas which took on the nature of a distinctive, self-sustaining discipline: 'geology'.
Main Description
Between the mid-seventeenth century and the early nineteenth century there developed in Britain a range of empirical and increasingly secular sciences concerned with the earth. This book presents a detailed account of how this development led to the creation of a complex socio-intellectual fabric of methods, ambitions, facts and ideas which took on the nature of a distinctive, self-sustaining discipline: 'geology'. During this period the criteria for a proper science of the earth were continually reassessed and the earth as an object of science was radically reinterpreted. In his account of this transformation, Dr Porter treats science as an integral but distinct part of the spectrum of man's intellectual and social activities. His account thus illuminates the nature of science and scientific knowledge as a dynamic intellectual, social and cultural enterprise. The book will be of interest not only to historians and philosophers of science but also to social historians and geologists.
Main Description
Between the mid-seventeenth century and the early nineteenth century there developed in Britain a range of empirical and increasingly secular sciences concerned with the earth. This book presents the first detailed account of how this development led to the creation of a complex socio-intellectual fabric of methods, ambitions, facts and ideas which took on the nature of a distinctive, self-sustaining discipline: 'geology'. During this period the criteria for a proper science of the earth were continually reassessed and the earth as an object of science was radically reinterpreted. In his account of this transformation, Dr Porter treats science as an integral but distinct part of the spectrum of man's intellectual and social activities. His account thus illuminates the nature of science and scientific knowledge as a dynamic intellectual, social and cultural enterprise. The book will be of interest not only to historians and philosophers of science but also to social historians and geologists.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Orientations: c. 1660- 1710
The natural history of the Earth
The re-creation of the Earth
A deepening base: c. 1710-1775
Continuity and change
Changing social formations: c.. 1775-1815
A reformation of knowledge
The constitution of geology
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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