Catalogue


The first freedoms : church and state in America to the passage of the First Amendment /
Thomas J. Curry.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1986.
description
viii, 276 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0195036611 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1986.
isbn
0195036611 :
catalogue key
3451605
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [223]-267) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Thomas J. Curry, a Roman Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, received his Ph.D. degree from Claremont Graduate School
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1986-07:
The debate continues concerning the meaning of the ``establishment clause'' of the First Amendment to the federal constitution. In this study, Curry ventures to determine the intent of the framers by establishing the perspective from which they operated. The first seven chapters trace the history of church and state relations, along with the concepts of liberty of conscience and establishment. The final chapter deals with the debate in Congress over the issue of church and state. Curry concludes that the framers, echoing the sentiments of the populace, intended religion to be free of government. Given the current importance of the religious issue in the US, this study should prove enlightening. Originally the author's dissertation, the book is scholarly yet not pedantic. It is extensively footnoted, but, regrettably, lacks a bibliography. Public and academic libraries serving upper-division undergraduates and above.-J.J. Fox Jr., Salem State College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1986
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Summaries
Main Description
Is government forbidden to assist all religions equally, as the Supreme Court has held? Or does the First Amendment merely ban exclusive aid to one religion, as critics of the Court assert? After years of debate the controversy still rages on, with both positions now more solidified but neither side victorious. The First Freedoms studies the Church-State context of colonial and revolutionary America to provide a bold new reading of the historical meaning of the religion clauses of the First Amendment. Synthesizing and interpreting a wealth of evidence from the founding of Virginia to the passage of the Bill of Rights, including everything published in America before 1791, Thomas Curry traces America's developing ideas on religious liberty and offers the most extensive investigation ever of the historical origins and background of the First Amendment religion clauses. While recognizing that history cannot resolve all modern Church-State issues, Thomas Curry does show that historians can make some definitive statements about what early Americans understood by establishment and the free exercise of religion. This pathbreaking study has been adopted by the History Book Club.
Long Description
Is government forbidden to assist all religions equally, as the Supreme Court has held? Or does the First Amendment merely ban exclusive aid to one religion, as critics of the Court assert? The First Freedoms studies the church-state context of colonial and revolutionary America to present a bold new reading of the historical meaning of the religion clauses of the First Amendment. Synthesizing and interpreting a wealth of evidence from the founding of Virginia to thepassage of the Bill of Rights, including everything published in America before 1791, Thomas Curry traces America's developing ideas on religious liberty and offers the most extensive investigation ever of the historical origins and background of the First Amendment's religion clauses.
Table of Contents
The New England Way in Church and State to 1691p. 1
Church and State in Seventeenth-Century Virginia and Marylandp. 29
Church and State in the Restoration Coloniesp. 54
Liberty of Conscience in Eighteenth-Century Colonial Americap. 78
Establishment of Religion in Colonial Americap. 105
Religion and Government in Revolutionary America Part I: The Southern Statesp. 134
Religion and Government in Revolutionary America Part II: The Middle States and New Englandp. 159
"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof...,"p. 193
Notesp. 223
Indexp. 269
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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