Catalogue

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The Vatican, the bishops, and Irish politics, 1919-39 /
Dermot Keogh.
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1986.
description
xvi, 304 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521301297
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1986.
isbn
0521301297
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
3447963
 
Bibliography: p. 281-294.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1986-09:
As the author notes, this book complements other studies of Irish church-state relations, which complicates the review process; it is perhaps better to consider how this study stands on its own. After a murky first chapter, the narrative line clears and the author engrossingly weaves his way through the Anglo-Irish War, the Treaty of 1921, establishment of the Irish Free State, the Civil War, the transfer of power from Cosgrave to de Valera, and Vatican-Irish-British relations, including coverage of the personal and political splits within and between Irish republicans and clergy. Regrettably, Keogh occasionally engages in the historian's predilection for overdescribing and underanalyzing events and individuals. This is evident in his later chapters, particularly as regards the drafting and adoption of the 1937 constitution. For instance, one unaddressed question is: How did the decision to write a new constitute emerge? Little attention and no elaboration are devoted to the thinking of de Valera, his supporters and opponents, the Irish clergy, and the Vatican on the effect of the new constitution on Catholic-Protestant relations within the Free State and Northern Ireland, as well as on North-South and Anglo-Irish relations. Both politicians and clerics were clearly aware of such considerations, but chose to ignore them. Analysis of their thinking would have been helpful. Despite these comments, this book would be a solid addition to academic libraries with collections in Irish history and politics or church-state relations. However, its classroom potential, even at the advanced graduate level, would be limited.-L.E. Dutter, University of Illinois at Chicago
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1986
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
A detailed study of the political relations between church and state in modern Ireland, this work is also an analysis of domestic politics within the context of Anglo-Vatican relations. This book assesses the relative political strength of both the British and the Irish at the Vatican and challenges 'the myth of English dominance over the Papacy'.
Description for Library
A detailed study of the political relations between church and state in modern Ireland, this work is also an analysis of domestic politics within the context of Anglo-Vatican relations. Dealing exclusively with high ecclesiastical politics, it assesses the relative political strength of both the British and the Irish at the Vatican and challenges 'the myth of English dominance over the Papacy'.
Main Description
A detailed study of the political relations between church and state in modern Ireland, this work is also an analysis of domestic politics within the context of Anglo-Vatican relations. Dealing exclusively with high ecclesiastical politics, it assesses the relative political strength of both the British and the Irish at the Vatican and challenges 'the myth of English dominance over the Papacy'. Dermot Keogh traces the 'quiet diplomacy' of bishops, politicians and the Vatican from the turbulent years of 1919-21, through the civil war period and the rule of William T. Cosgrove and Cumann na nGaedheal, to the re-emergence of Eamon de Valera and Fianna Fail as exponents of Catholic nationalism in the 1930s. The book draws extensively on unpublished documents and, for the first time, explores with the aid of primary sources the exchanges between bishops, politicians and the Vatican over a twenty-year period. It is an important contribution to the history of modern Ireland, Irish-Vatican and Anglo-Vatican relations, whose findings will lead to a radical revision of interpretations of Irish church-state relations.
Table of Contents
List of illustrations
Abbreviations
Preface
Introduction
William Walsh and the Anglo-Vatican tradition
The Papacy, the Bishops and the Anglo-Irish war, 1919-1921
The hierarcht and the treaty
The Vatican and the Civil War
Cumann na nGaedheal and the quest for legitimacy
Cosgrave, de Valera and the Confessional challenge
De Valera, Fianna Fail and the catholic church
Conclusion
Appendices
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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