Catalogue


Russia, Ukraine, and the breakup of the Soviet Union /
Roman Szporluk.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Hoover Institution Press, c2000.
description
xlix, 437 p. : ill., maps
ISBN
0817995420
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Hoover Institution Press, c2000.
isbn
0817995420
catalogue key
3441399
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Roman Szporluk is the Mykhailo Hrushevsky Professor of Ukrainian History and director of the Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-01-03:
Despite the implication that these 16 chapters plus a lengthy introduction were written after the breakup of the USSR, in reality the articles were mostly written earlier, the first appearing in 1971. The essays by a distinguished scholar of eastern Europe represent a lifetime of thinking about the USSR/Russian colossus that towered over the author's native Ukraine and other nations of the Eurasian subcontinent. From the very beginning Szporluk identified a number of contradictions within that colossus that in time turned out to be fatal to it. It was easy to perceive an ongoing conflict between Russia and the other ethnics of the realm. It was more perspicuous to see impending interconnected contradictions between Russia and the USSR, and the USSR and modernity. The author sees the world through the glasses of nationalism--the miraculous force that he believes can build empires while it also breaks them up. Though the author was never a forecaster of the Soviet breakup, in retrospect the essays add up to a road map that explains it. With a good index and well-footnoted essays, this volume belongs in all public and college libraries. A. Ezergailis; Ithaca College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2001
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Roman Szporluk focuses on the critical relationship between Ukraine and Russia and presents a story that is often lost in the standard interpretations of the collapse of communism.
Main Description
The key to understanding what was unimaginable in November 1989 yet became a reality in December 1991, Szporluk says, lies in understanding the relationship of Ukraine and Russia. With this in mind, he offers insightful new perspectives on many critical questions surrounding the decline and fall of the Soviet system, such as Why were the processes of Russian identity formation not yet completed by the time of the communist takeover in 1917-and what did this mean for the future of the USSR? Why did Gorbachev and his advisers so misjudge the condition of the Soviet Union at the end of the 1980s? How unrealistic was their sense of what the Soviet bloc represented at that time? Why did the Soviet Union fail to adjust to and take advantage of the current "scientific-technical revolution"? How did the leaders of the Soviet state perceive the problem of the nationalities in the USSR and their relations with their East European allies? Why were West Ukraine and other Baltic states-the "Soviet West"-an alien and potentially disruptive element in the Soviet body politic? Why did Soviet leaders never find a successful resolution of the problem of Russian-Ukrainian relations? Without claiming that the collapse of communism or the breakup of the Soviet Union was "caused" by any one factor, Russia, Ukraine, and the Breakup of the Soviet Union makes an insightful and original contribution to the discussion surrounding one of the most significant political events of the twentieth century.
Main Description
Focusing on the critical relationship between Ukraine and Russia, renowned scholar Roman Szporluk chronicles the final two decades in the history of the Soviet Union and presents a story that is often lost in the standard interpretations of the collapse of communism.
Main Description
The key to understanding what was unimaginable in November 1989 yet became a reality in December 1991, Szporluk says, lies in understanding the relationship of Ukraine and Russia. With this in mind, he offers insightful new perspectives on many critical questions surrounding the decline and fall of the Soviet system, such as Why were the processes of Russian identity formation not yet completed by the time of the communist takeover in 1917--and what did this mean for the future of the USSR? Why did Gorbachev and his advisers so misjudge the condition of the Soviet Union at the end of the 1980s? How unrealistic was their sense of what the Soviet bloc represented at that time? Why did the Soviet Union fail to adjust to and take advantage of the current "scientific-technical revolution"? How did the leaders of the Soviet state perceive the problem of the nationalities in the USSR and their relations with their East European allies? Why were West Ukraine and other Baltic states--the "Soviet West"--an alien and potentially disruptive element in the Soviet body politic? Why did Soviet leaders never find a successful resolution of the problem of Russian-Ukrainian relations? Without claiming that the collapse of communism or the breakup of the Soviet Union was "caused" by any one factor, Russia, Ukraine, and the Breakup of the Soviet Union makes an insightful and original contribution to the discussion surrounding one of the most significant political events of the twentieth century.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
A Note on Transliterationp. xvii
Introductionp. xix
Nationalities and the Russian Problem in the USSR: A Historical Outlinep. 1
The Nations of the USSR in 1970p. 29
Russians in Ukraine and Problems of Ukrainian Identity in the USSRp. 71
West Ukraine and West Belorussia: Historical Tradition, Social Communication, and Linguistic Assimilationp. 109
Urbanization in Ukraine since the Second World Warp. 139
History and Russian Nationalismp. 161
Dilemmas of Russian Nationalismp. 183
The Imperial Legacy and the Soviet Nationalities Problemp. 229
The Soviet West--or Far Eastern Europe?p. 259
The Press and Soviet Nationalities: The Party Resolution of 1975 and Its Implementationp. 277
The Strange Politics of Lviv: An Essay in Search of an Explanationp. 299
Nation-Building in Ukraine: Problems and Prospectsp. 319
Reflections on Ukraine after 1994: The Dilemmas of Nationhoodp. 327
After Empire: What?p. 343
Ukraine: From an Imperial Periphery to a Sovereign Statep. 361
The Fall of the Tsarist Empire and the USSR: The Russian Question and Imperial Overextensionp. 395
Indexp. 431
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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