Catalogue


No band of brothers : problems in the rebel high command /
Steven E. Woodworth.
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, 1999.
description
xx, 182 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0826212557 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, 1999.
isbn
0826212557 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3427109
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 159-176) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Steven E. Woodworth is Assistant Professor of History at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-04:
There is little question that Woodworth is rapidly becoming one of the leading scholars of the American Civil War. This collection of ten essays--most previously published--gives the reader an idea of the breadth of his work on the Confederate high command. Most of the essays focus on Confederate President Jefferson Davis's relationship with his field commanders. For example, "Davis and Lee in the Seven Days" is both gracefully written and a model for other scholars to follow. The author concludes that Davis gave General Robert E. Lee "everything the president of the Confederacy could have given except the strategic guidance of a wise commander-in-chief." Another model essay, "The President's Choices: Confederate Command of the Eve of the Atlanta Campaign," points out how Davis missed opportunities to change direction in the South's disastrous western campaign in 1864. These provocative essays, along with the author's other works on Confederate leadership, have forced Civil War scholars to take a fresh look at Jefferson Davis and his commanders. This volume is recommended for anyone interested in the Civil War. All levels. D. L. Wilson; Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2000
Reference & Research Book News, November 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The Civil War was barely over before Southerners and other students of the war began to examine the Confederate high command in search of an explanation for the South's failure. Although years of research failed to show that the South's defeat was due to a single, overriding cause, the actions of the Southern leaders during the war were certainly among the reasons the South lost the war. InNo Band of Brothers,Steven Woodworth explores, through a series of essays, various facets of the way the Confederacy waged its unsuccessful war for secession. He examines Jefferson Davis and some of his more important generals, including Pierre G. T. Beauregard, Leonidas Polk, Joseph E. Johnston, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson; the Confederacy's strategic plans; and the South's success in making competent officers out of men with very little military preparation. Woodworth particularly looks at the personalities and personal relationships that affected the course and outcome of the war. What made a good general? What could make an otherwise able man a failure as a general? What role did personal friendships or animosities play in the Confederacy's top command assignments and decisions? How successful was the Confederacy in making competent generals out of its civilian leaders? In what ways did Jefferson Davis succeed or fail in maximizing the chances for the success of his cause? In analyzing the Confederate leadership, Woodworth reveals some weaknesses, many strengths, and much new information.No Band of Brotherswill be an important addition to Civil War scholarship and will be welcomed by professional historians, amateur historians, students, and the general reader alike.
Publisher Fact Sheet
Explores various facets of the South's unsuccessful war for secession, specifically the personalities & personal relationships of the Confederate high command.
Unpaid Annotation
The Civil War was barely over before Southerners and other students of the war began to examine the Confederate high command in search of an explanation for the South's failure. Although years of research failed to show that the South's defeat was due to a single, overriding cause, the actions of the Southern leaders during the war were certainly among the reasons the South lost the war.In No Band of Brothers, Steven Woodworth explores, through a series of essays, various facets of the way the Confederacy waged its unsuccessful war for secession. He examines Jefferson Davis and some of his more important generals, including Pierre G. T. Beauregard, Leonidas Polk, Joseph E. Johnston, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, and Winfield Scott; the Confederacy's strategic plans; and the South's success in making competent officers out of men with very little military preparation.Woodworth particularly looks at the personalities and personal relationships that affected the course and outcome of the war. What made a good general? What could make an otherwise able man a failure as a general? What role did personal friendships or animosities play in the Confederacy's top command assignments and decisions? How successful was the Confederacy in making competent generals out of its civilian leaders? In what ways did Jefferson Davis succeed or fail in maximizing the chances for the success of his cause?In analyzing the Confederate leadership, Woodworth reveals some weaknesses, many strengths, and much new information. No Band of Brothers will be an important addition to Civil War scholarship and will be welcomed by professional historians, amateur historians,students, and the general reader alike.
Main Description
The Civil War was barely over before Southerners and other students of the war began to examine the Confederate high command in search of an explanation for the South's failure. Although years of research failed to show that the South's defeat was due to a single, overriding cause, the actions of the Southern leaders during the war were certainly among the reasons the South lost the war. In No Band of Brothers,Steven Woodworth explores, through a series of essays, various facets of the way the Confederacy waged its unsuccessful war for secession. He examines Jefferson Davis and some of his more important generals, including Pierre G. T. Beauregard, Leonidas Polk, Joseph E. Johnston, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson; the Confederacy's strategic plans; and the South's success in making competent officers out of men with very little military preparation. Woodworth particularly looks at the personalities and personal relationships that affected the course and outcome of the war. What made a good general? What could make an otherwise able man a failure as a general? What role did personal friendships or animosities play in the Confederacy's top command assignments and decisions? How successful was the Confederacy in making competent generals out of its civilian leaders? In what ways did Jefferson Davis succeed or fail in maximizing the chances for the success of his cause? In analyzing the Confederate leadership, Woodworth reveals some weaknesses, many strengths, and much new information. No Band of Brotherswill be an important addition to Civil War scholarship and will be welcomed by professional historians, amateur historians, students, and the general reader alike.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Provenance of the Contentsp. xix
Davis, Beauregard, and Washington, D.C., 1861p. 1
Davis, Polk, and the End of Kentucky Neutralityp. 12
Confederate Command in Microcosm: The Case of Williamsburgp. 19
Davis and Lee in the Seven Daysp. 38
"Dismembering the Confederacy": Jefferson Davis and the Trans-Mississippi Westp. 51
Soldier with a Blunted Sword: Braxton Bragg and His Lieutenants in the Chickamauga Campaignp. 70
The President's Choices: Confederate Command Options on the Eve of the Atlanta Campaignp. 81
Beauregard at Bermuda Hundredp. 94
Hood, Davis, and the Army of Tennessee: Elements of a Confederate Debaclep. 118
Homespun Generals: Nonprofessional Officers in the Confederate Armyp. 130
Notesp. 159
Indexp. 177
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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