Catalogue


Egypt in late antiquity /
Roger S. Bagnall.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c1993.
description
xii, 370 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., facsims., plans. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0691069867 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c1993.
isbn
0691069867 :
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
3423771
 
Bibliography: p. [339]-360.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-04:
Within the context of the late Roman Empire this excellent book assesses the society, economy, and culture of Egypt in the fourth century CE. Bagnall uses the written papyri derived largely from Oxyrhynchos as well as from Antinoopolis, Panopolis, and a scattering of other communities. Although the written texts express the interests of the urban propertied classes, the author makes every effort to offer a balanced perspective. The work is rich in its exploration of the relations of the urban centers to the rural districts; the manner by which power was institutionalized and used; the interaction that characterized the international language and culture of Greek and Latin with the indigenous communities; and the processes by which this part of the world became increasingly Christianized. Bagnall details aspects of late antiquity in a manner that is as vivid and compelling as the best of ethnographic writing. Whether dealing with changes in diet or the legal rights of slaves, he paints an extraordinarily vivid picture of a century that straddles the end of the Classic world and the beginning of something entirely new. Readers interested in the worlds of ancient Egypt, Rome, and the early Christian church will find this an authoritative and profoundly stimulating read. All levels. C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky; Harvard University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This excellent book assesses the society, economy, and culture of Egypt in the fourth century. . . . Whether dealing with changes in diet or the legal rights of slaves [Bagnall] paints an extraordinarily vivid picture of a century that straddles the end of the Classical world and the beginning of something entirely new."-- Choice
"[This book] represents the most expansive study of Egyptian society in transition yet produced, both voluminously documented and self-critical in its use of papyrological evidence. . . . A tremendous contribution to our understanding of social, economic, and administrative activity in early Byzantine Egypt--and therefore to our knowledge of the late Roman Empire as a whole."-- David Frankfurter, Bryn Mawr Classical Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 1994
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Summaries
Main Description
This book brings together a vast amount of information pertaining to the society, economy, and culture of a province important to understanding the entire eastern part of the later Roman Empire. Focusing on Egypt from the accession of Diocletian in 284 to the middle of the fifth century, Roger Bagnall draws his evidence mainly from documentary and archaeological sources, including the papyri that have been published over the last thirty years.
Back Cover Copy
"This is an immensely authoritative and detailed work that for many years will be the standard scholarly book on Egypt in the fourth and fifth centuries."-- Alan K. Bowman, Christ Church, University of Oxford
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Preface
A Note on References and Abbreviations
Introductionp. 3
The Environmentp. 15
The Citiesp. 45
Country Villagesp. 110
City and Countryp. 148
People and Familiesp. 181
Power and Dependencep. 208
Languages, Literacy, and Ethnicityp. 230
This World and the Nextp. 261
A Mediterranean Societyp. 310
Timep. 327
Money and Measuresp. 330
The Nomesp. 333
Glossary of Technical Termsp. 336
Bibliographyp. 339
General Indexp. 361
Index of Texts Discussedp. 369
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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