Catalogue


Assisting emigration to Upper Canada : the Petworth project, 1832-1837 /
Wendy Cameron and Mary McDougall Maude.
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, 2000.
description
xv, 354 p. : ill.
ISBN
0773520341 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, 2000.
isbn
0773520341 :
catalogue key
3417736
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Assisting Emigration to Upper Canada is a very impressively researched [book] ... It contributes to the growing interest in English immigration to Canada, especially in its detailed description of ordinary immigrants ... It also is one of a very few case studies of assisted emigration and has the potential to compliment the large body of literature that exists on unassisted emigration." Catharine Wilson, Department of History, University of Guelph
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Summaries
Main Description
Using a rich collection of contemporary sources, this study focuses on one group of English immigrants sent to Upper Canada from Sussex and other southern counties with the aid of parishes and landlords. In Part One, Wendy Cameron follows the work of the Petworth Emigration Committee over six years and trace how the immigrants were received in each of these years. In Part Two, Mary McDougall Maude presents a complete list of emigrants on Petworth ships from 1832 to 1837, including details of their background, family reconstructions, and additional information drawn from Canadian sources. Paternalism strong enough to slow the wheels of change is embodied here in Thomas Sockett, the organizer of the Petworth emigrations, and his patron, the Earl of Egremont, and in Lieutenant Governor Sir John Colborne in Upper Canada. The friction created as these men sought to sustain older values in the relationship between rich and poor highlights the shift in British emigration policy. In these years of transition immigrants sent by the Petworth Emigration Committee could accept assistance and the government direction that went with it, or they could rely on their own resources and find work for themselves. Once the transition was complete, the market-driven model took over and immigrants had to make their own best bargain for their labour.
Unpaid Annotation
The 1830s were years of social and political change in Britain. Rural unrest in 1830-31 spurred politicians and landlords to reexamine the roles government and individuals should play in fighting poverty. Assisting Emigration to Upper Canada examines how new attitudes and policies towards the English poor in this decade affected the British government's approach to emigration and to new immigrants in British colonies.Using a rich collection of contemporary sources, Wendy Cameron and Mary McDougall Maude focus on one group of English immigrants sent to Upper Canada from Sussex and other southern counties with the aid of parishes and landlords. They follow the work of the Petworth Emigration Committee over six years and trace the emigrants from their place of origin to their first settlement in Upper Canada. Their work demonstrates that new rules for poor relief in England were reflected in Colonial Office instructions for receiving new immigrants in Upper Canada.

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