Catalogue


North American economic integration : theory and practice /
Norris C. Clement ... [et al.].
imprint
Cheltenham ; Northampton, Mass. : Edward Elgar Publishing, 1999.
description
xiii, 346 p. : ill.
ISBN
1840641029
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cheltenham ; Northampton, Mass. : Edward Elgar Publishing, 1999.
isbn
1840641029
catalogue key
3417559
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Norris C. Clement is Professor of Economics and Director of International Projects in the Institute of Regional Studies of the Californias at San Diego State University, USA. Gustavo del Castillo Vera is Coordinator of the Political Economy Working Group at Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Mexico. James Gerber is Associate Professor of Economics at San Diego State University and Economic Research Fellow with the San Diego Dialogue at the University of California, USA. William A. Kerr is Professor of Economics, University of Calgary Alan J. MacFadyen is Associate Professor of Economics, University of Calgary. Stanford Shedd is a Consulting Economist in Calgary, Canada. Eduardo Zepeda is Professor of Economics with the Centre for Socioeconomic Studies at the Universidad Autonoma de Coahuila, Mexico. Diana Alarcon is an Economist with the Inter-American Institute for Social Development at the Inter-American Development Bank, USA.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-06:
This excellent introduction and overview of developments leading up to the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) was prepared by a team of university economists from each of the NAFTA nations--Canada, Mexico, and the US. Part 1 introduces the theory and practice of international trade and commerce and provides background information on the benefits that can accrue from international economic integration. The next section includes summaries of the recent economic histories of all three NAFTA participants, which demonstrate how economic integration was well established among them long before the agreement was signed. Part 3 asserts that the terms of NAFTA owed as much to political considerations as to sound arguments based on economic theory, and that little attention was paid to the problems of linking two advanced industrial nations with a developing economy. The authors conclude that NAFTA provides for managed, not free trade, and that flaws in the agreement will need to be corrected as the growth of continental-trilateral integration continues. Graphs and tables feature national and comparative economic statistics; glossary of terms; useful background notes in some chapters. Recommended for general readers and undergraduate students. G. T. Potter; Ramapo College of New Jersey
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2000
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Summaries
Main Description
. . . excellent introduction and overview of developments leading up to the implementation of the North American Free Trade Act. Recommended for general readers and undergraduate students. G.T. Potter, Choice It is rare to find a book written by so many authors that reads as smoothly as this. What distinguishes this volume from other books on the reasons for NAFTA is its wider approach to the topic. Rather than simply focusing on the immediate reasons for the negotiation of NAFTA the authors place this agreement in a larger historical context. They review the evolution of the global economy in the postwar period as well as the specific industrial strategies of the NAFTA partners. A signal contribution of the book is the attention it gives to the analysis of international trade and the benefits of global and preferential trading arrangements. Maureen Appel Molot, Carleton University, Canada This is a first-rate text for undergraduate students because of the readable way the trilateral group of authors from Canada, Mexico and the US discuss the evolution of trade theory and then relate this to the development of trade policy in each of their countries and the process of trade integration in North America. Sidney Weintraub, Centre for Strategic and International Studies, Washington DC, US Thoroughly researched and lucidly written, this impressive book is not only a key reference source on NAFTA, but a definitive guide to emergent issues in trade policy. Mark Casson, University of Reading, UK This highly accessible book explains the theoretical, historical and political background of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), its impact and the debates surrounding its existence. In addition the authors provide a brief introduction to the theory of economic integration as well as a succinct overview of the evolution of the global economy, and the institutions that manage it, in the post World War II period. Key issues examined include: how and why NAFTA emerged in the early 1990s and its performance since implementation the economic development and commercial policy of each member country in the context of the rapidly changing global economy NAFTA s technical strengths and limitations the debates which still rage between its proponents and critics The team of US, Canadian and Mexican authors argue that while NAFTA has introduced novel social and environmental innovations in trade agreements, given Mexico s macroeconomic volatility, it provides a less than perfect approach for managing North America s rapidly expanding economic integration. North American Economic Integration can be used by a wide audience from students to professionals and academics from any discipline with an understanding of the basic principles of economics. Specifically, the book will be welcomed by students of international economics, political economy and international relations.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This introduction to the theoretical, historical and political background of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) explores its impact and the debates surrounding its existence.
Unpaid Annotation
As part of a larger project funded by the US Information Agency's University Affiliation Program, Canadian, US, and Mexican economists explain the North American Free Trade Agreement to readers who understand the basic principles of economics. They consider how and why it emerged in the early 1990s and its performance since implementation, the economic development and commercial policy of each member country in the context of the global economy, the pact's technical strengths and limitation, and ongoing debates. They argue that it has introduced social and environmental innovations in trade agreements, but provides a less than perfect approach to managing the continent's economic integration.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vi
List of Tablesp. vii
Notes on Authorsp. viii
Prefacep. xi
Introductionp. 3
NAFTA in the Global Contextp. 5
International Integration: Theory and Practicep. 23
The Global Economy after World War IIp. 67
Introductionp. 103
The United States after World War IIp. 117
Canada's Economic Development and Integrationp. 157
Mexico's Economic Developmentp. 207
Introductionp. 251
North American Economic Integration: Trial by Firep. 253
NAFTA and Beyondp. 279
Referencesp. 317
Glossaryp. 327
Indexp. 339
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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