Catalogue


Reading the rhythm : the poetics of French free verse, 1910-1930 /
Clive Scott.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Clarendon Press, 1993.
description
290 p.
ISBN
0198158823
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Clarendon Press, 1993.
isbn
0198158823
catalogue key
3403073
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [276]-285) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-04:
American students of modern French literature generally prefer to study the novel or theater, rather than poetry. This is especially true of undergraduates. Since the triumph of modernism, poetry (like art and music) is often seen as difficult to understand, and therefore to appreciate. The present study is a powerful, useful, and effective antidote to this condition, for it uses several linguistic concepts, combined with close readings and explications, to explain what free verse is, how it came to be developed, and how it functions. It focuses on works from the period 1910-30 but reaches back to the origins of free verse in the late 19th century to make its case. It is especially useful in resurrecting and making accessible the poetry of Blaise Cendrars, who is not as widely read in the English-speaking world as the other poets studied here--Saint-John Perse, Apollinaire, Supervielle, and Reverdy. In a day when university presses still largely shy away from publishing books that can be read by nonspecialists, this study is a delightful surprise. Rigorously intelligent and clearly argued, it is a work that every college library should own. D. O'Connell; Georgia State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'a well-informed, thorough, sensitive and excellently organized book on Laforgue's poetry as a whole ... Reading the Rhythm contains a range of treasures for the anglophone reader of modern French verse'Times Literary Supplement'Detailed and subtle rhythmic analyses of poems from Éloges, Prose du Transsibérien, Gravitations, Sources du vent, Calligrammes, Dix-neuf poèmes élastiques and Documentaires. The first four of these in particular receive truly ground-breaking readings ... tutors will find it a revelation and a liberation, from which their students can only benefit as much as they do.'Forum for Modern Language Studies'These poets aimed to create new attitudes to the syllable as metrical element; after reading this book, it is impossible not to apply those attitudes in one's reading. Most undergraduates would find the sometimes wordy lapidariness of the book hard going, but their tutors will find it a revelation and a liberation, from which their students can only benefit as much as they do.'FMLS Vol 8 '94'the poetry specialist interested in free verse or in any of the poets studied will likely to find it to be thought-provoking and rewarding'Charles D. Minahen, Ohio State University, The French Review, Vol.70, No.3, February 1997
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 1994
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Summaries
Main Description
We are still a long way from knowing how to read the rhythms of free verse, a poetry which has been largely neglected by metrical theory. Clive Scott's readable and scholarly study indicates the strategies of reading needed in order to do justice to free verse's rhythmic versatility. The core of the book is an analysis of key twentieth-century poets and poems, including Perse's 0loges; Cendrars'sProse du Transsib rien,Dix-neuf poemes lastiques, andDocumentaires; Apollinaire'sCalligrammes; Supervielle'sGravitations; and Reverdy'sSources du vent. He also looks at contemporary trends in the visual arts--Cubism, Futurism, Orphism, photography--to illuminate free verse's perceptual models and discusses the theme of travel and movement.
Main Description
We are still a long way from knowing how to read the rhythms of free verse, a poetry which has been largely neglected by metrical theory. Clive Scott's readable and scholarly study indicates the strategies of reading needed in order to do justice to free verse's rhythmic versatility. The core of the book is an analysis of key twentieth-century poets and poems, including Perse's Éloges ; Cendrars's Prose du Transsibérien , Dix-neuf poemes élastiques , and Documentaires ; Apollinaire's Calligrammes ; Supervielle's Gravitations ; and Reverdy's Sources du vent . He also looks at contemporary trends in the visual arts--Cubism, Futurism, Orphism, photography--to illuminate free verse's perceptual models and discusses the theme of travel and movement.
Main Description
We are still a long way from knowing how to read the rhythms of free verse, a poetry which has been largely neglected by metrical theory. Clive Scott's readable and scholarly study indicates the strategies of reading needed in order to do justice to free verse's rhythmic versatility. The core of the book is an analysis of key twentieth-century poets and poems, including Perse'sloges; Cendrars'sProse du Transsibrien,Dix-neuf poemes lastiques, andDocumentaires; Apollinaire'sCalligrammes; Supervielle'sGravitations; and Reverdy'sSources du vent. He also looks at contemporary trends in the visual arts--Cubism, Futurism, Orphism, photography--to illuminate free verse's perceptual models and discusses the theme of travel and movement.
Long Description
We are still a long way from knowing how to read the rhythms of free verse, a poetry which has been largely neglected by metrical theory. Clive Scott's readable and scholarly study indicates the strategies of reading needed if justice is to be done to free verse's rhythmic versatility. The core of Reading the Rhythm is an analysis of key French twentieth-century poets and poems, including Perse's Éloges, Cendrars'sProse du Transsibérien, Dix-neuf poèmes élastiques, and Documentaires; Apollinaire's Calligrammes; Supervielle's Gravitations; and Reverdy's Sources de vent. Contemporary trends in the visual arts - Cubism, Futurism, Orphism, photography - are called upon as perceptual models to illuminate free verse and a further perspectiveis added by the theme of travel and movement. This is an accomplished examination of the rhythms of free verse, and of its implications for our reading of regular verse. It is also a significant study of modernist poetics.
Long Description
We are still a long way from knowing how to read the rhythms of free verse, a poetry which has been largely neglected by metrical theory. Clive Scott's readable and scholarly study indicates the strategies of reading needed in order to do justice to free verse's rhythmic versatility. The core of the book is an analysis of key twentieth-century poets and poems, including Perse's Eloges; Cendrars's Prose du Transsiberien, Dix-neuf poemes elastiques, and Documentaires; Apollinaire's Calligrammes; Supervielle's Gravitations; and Reverdy's Sources du vent. He also looks at contemporary trends in the visual arts--Cubism, Futurism, Orphism, photography--to illuminate free verse's perceptual models and discusses the theme of travel and movement.
Main Description
Clive Scott examines the work of a range of early 20th-century poets, including Cendrars, Apollinaire, Perse, and Supervielle in order to indicate the reading strategies needed to do justice to the rhythmic versatility of free verse.
Table of Contents
Notes on the Text
Prefatory Remarksp. 1
Introductory Reflections on Rhythm and Metrep. 3
Saint-John Perse, Eloges (1911): The Prosody of Boundaryp. 25
Blaise Cendrars, Prose du Transsiberien et de la petite Jeanne de France (1913): The Prosody of Locomotionp. 57
Guillaume Apollinaire, Calligrammes (1918): The Prosody of the Visualp. 88
Blaise Cendrars, Dix-neuf poemes elastiques (1919): The Prosody of Orphismp. 121
Blaise Cendrars, Documentaires (1924): The Prosody of Photographyp. 154
Jules Supervielle, Gravitations (1925/1932): The Prosody of Displacementp. 184
Pierre Reverdy, Sources du vent (1929): The Prosody of Cubismp. 216
Conclusionp. 247
App. I: Glossary of Technical Termsp. 256
App. II: Full Texts of Poems Analysedp. 262
Bibliographical Referencesp. 276
Further Bibliographyp. 282
Indexp. 287
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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