Catalogue


The transformation of the Christian Right /
Matthew C. Moen.
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c1992.
description
x, 209 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0817305742 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c1992.
isbn
0817305742 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3384271
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [189]-201) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1992-12:
The past 15 years have seen the right wing of American Protestantism undergo a profound change, as remarkable as any in the past century. Moen maps the transformation from true-believing rigidity, bent on changing Washington, to adoption of a more conciliatory rhetoric, to development of secular sophistication, to a take-over of the Republican Party. He carefully handles leading personalities and serious differences among groups e.g., fundamentalists and evangelicals within and outside of denominations. He wisely relies on Kenneth D. Wald's Religion and Politics in the United States (1987) as well as dozens of personal interviews to assess the evolution at the national level. Although there is some disarray, the religious right is still vibrant, even without an acknowledged national leader or agreed-upon agenda. So much of its strength is regional and local now, but that dimension is beyond the author's research. Garry Wills's Under God (1990), with its different scope, complements Moen's study. The phenomenon of the often articulate Catholic right unfortunately receives hardly a mention. Undergraduate libraries should have the book available for religious studies, American studies, history, and political science students. D. A. Brown; California State University, Fullerton
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1992
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Summaries
Main Description
The Transformation of the Christian Right chronicles and analyzes the remarkable changes that have occurred in the Christian Right from its emergence in the late 1970s to the present. Specifically, it documents the rapid turnover of Christian-Right organizations and explains the forces driving that kaleidoscopic change. Moen also traces the strategic shift of the movement's leaders, away from lobbying the Congress and toward mobilizing conservative activists in the grass roots; he demonstrates the substitution of liberal language (with its emphasis on "equality, rights, and freedom") for moralistic language (with its focus on "right and wrong"). Much has been written about the Christian Right's impact on politics but little about how years of political activism have shaped and influenced the Christian Right. Moen addresses that neglected side of the issue. Moen challenges the popular wisdom that the Christian Right was weakened in the late 1980s by the scandals involving television evangelists, the failed presidential quest of Pat Robertson, and the dismantling of the Moral Majority by Reverend Jerry Falwell. He shows that the Christian Right remains vibrant and influential but in ways different today from in the early 1980s.
Main Description
The Transformation of the Christian Right chronicles and analyzes the remarkable changes that have occurred in the Christian Right from its emergence in the late 1970s to the present. Specifically, it documents the rapid turnover of Christian-Right organizations and explains the forces driving that kaleidoscopic change. Moen also traces the strategic shift of the movement's leaders, away from lobbying the Congress and toward mobilizing conservative activists in the grass roots; he demonstrates the substitution of liberal language (with its emphasis on "equality, rights, and freedom") for moralistic language (with its focus on "right and wrong").Much has been written about the Christian Right's impact on politics but little about how years of political activism have shaped and influenced the Christian Right. Moen addresses that neglected side of the issue.Moen challenges the popular wisdom that the Christian Right was weakened in the late 1980s by the scandals involving television evangelists, the failed presidential quest of Pat Robertson, and the dismantling of the Moral Majority by Reverend Jerry Falwell. He shows that the Christian Right remains vibrant and influential but in ways different today from in the early 1980s.
Table of Contents
Preface
The Metamorphosisp. 1
The Kaleidoscopic Structurep. 15
The Reconstitution Continuesp. 33
Continuity and Changep. 65
Farewell to Capitol Hillp. 89
From Moralism to Liberalismp. 119
Distinctiveness and Political Influencep. 141
Political Skills and Religious Beliefp. 155
Notesp. 161
Bibliographyp. 189
Indexp. 203
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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