Catalogue

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The ecological vision : reflections on the American condition /
Peter F. Drucker.
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c1993.
description
vii, 466 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1560000619
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c1993.
isbn
1560000619
catalogue key
3384257
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The thirty pieces (all previously published) range over many topics (with truly admirable coherence), are well-written (beautifully concise), very provocative (usually iconoclastic) and deeply (albeit randomly) seasoned with doses of sharp realism." --Colin A.M. Duncan, Labour/Le Travail "This book is a reflection of Drucker's synopic view of American society and social change--the tension between the need for continuity and the need for innovation. The author considers the study of this phenomenon "social ecology," and hence, the book's title. Drucker ranges across both subject matter and academic disciplines. . . . Drucker views economics, technology, politics, and art as dimensions of social experience and expressions of social value. Whether the reader fully accepts Drucker's analysis or not, this inclusive perspective is valuable and unique. This collection of his essays and his reflection on them does illuminate the streams of thought that have contributed to Drucker's influential work over nearly sixty years. All persons interested in public and business affairs, American society, leadership, and organizations will find this book both informative and stimulating." --Richard L. Chapman, Perspectives "...the book is broad and clear enough to appeal to a wide audience of readers. There are some chapters which would serve admirably as readings for introductory courses in economics, politics, philosophy or business management..." -- Enviromental Politics
"The thirty pieces (all previously published) range over many topics (with truly admirable coherence), are well-written (beautifully concise), very provocative (usually iconoclastic) and deeply (albeit randomly) seasoned with doses of sharp realism." -Colin A.M. Duncan, Labour/Le Travail "This book is a reflection of Drucker's synopic view of American society and social change-the tension between the need for continuity and the need for innovation. The author considers the study of this phenomenon "social ecology," and hence, the book's title. Drucker ranges across both subject matter and academic disciplines. . . . Drucker views economics, technology, politics, and art as dimensions of social experience and expressions of social value. Whether the reader fully accepts Drucker's analysis or not, this inclusive perspective is valuable and unique. This collection of his essays and his reflection on them does illuminate the streams of thought that have contributed to Drucker's influential work over nearly sixty years. All persons interested in public and business affairs, American society, leadership, and organizations will find this book both informative and stimulating." -Richard L. Chapman, Perspectives "...the book is broad and clear enough to appeal to a wide audience of readers. There are some chapters which would serve admirably as readings for introductory courses in economics, politics, philosophy or business management..." - Enviromental Politics
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Summaries
Main Description
Periods of great social change reveal a tension between the need for continuity and the need for innovation. To comprehend these changes as history and as guideposts to the future, Peter F. Drucker has, over a lifetime, pursued a discipline that he terms social ecology. The writings brought together in The Ecological Vision define the discipline as a sustained inquiry into the man-made environment and an active effort at maintaining equilibrium between change and conservation.
Table of Contents
Introduction
American Experiences
Introduction to Part Onep. 3
The American Genius Is Politicalp. 5
Calhoun's Pluralismp. 15
Henry Ford: The Last Populistp. 33
IBM's Watson: Vision for Tomorrowp. 47
The Myth of American Uniformityp. 59
Economics as a Social Dimension
Introduction to Part Twop. 75
The Economic Basis of American Politicsp. 79
The Poverty of Economic Theoryp. 95
The Delusion of Profitsp. 101
Schumpeter and Keynesp. 107
Keynes: Economics as a Magical Systemp. 119
The Social Function of Management
Introduction to Part Threep. 135
Management's Rolep. 137
Management: The Problems of Successp. 153
Social Innovation: Management's New Dimensionp. 177
Business as a Social Institution
Introduction to Part Fourp. 193
Can There Be "Business Ethics"?p. 195
The New Productivity Challengep. 215
The Emerging Theory of Manufacturingp. 233
The Hostile Takeover and Its Discontentsp. 249
Work, Tools, and Society
Introduction to Part Fivep. 275
Work and Toolsp. 277
Technology, Science, and Culturep. 287
India and Appropriate Technologyp. 299
The First Technological Revolution and Its Lessionsp. 305
The Information-Based Society
Introduction to Part Sixp. 317
Information, Communications, and Understandingp. 319
Information and the Future of the Cityp. 339
The Information-Based Organizationp. 345
Japan as Society and Civilization
Introduction to Part Sevenp. 361
A View of Japan through Japanese Artp. 363
Japan: The Problems of Successp. 381
Behind Japan's Successp. 397
Misinterpreting Japan and the Japanesep. 411
How Westernized Are the Japanese?p. 417
Why Society Is Not Enough
Introduction to Part Eightp. 425
The Unfashionable Kierkegaardp. 427
Afterword: Reflections of a Social Ecologistp. 441
Indexp. 459
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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