Catalogue


Invalid women : figuring feminine illness in American fiction and culture, 1840-1940 /
Diane Price Herndl.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c1993.
description
xv, 270 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0807844063 (pbk. : alk. paper) 0807821039 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c1993.
isbn
0807844063 (pbk. : alk. paper) 0807821039 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3383073
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [245]-261) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Diane Price Herndl, assistant professor of English at New Mexico State University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-09:
This book traces cultural representations of female illness during the century that marked the professionalization of medicine, the rise of the woman novelist, the increasing complexity of the literary marketplace, and wide-ranging debate over "the woman question." Price Herndl seeks to reconcile arguments interpreting women's illness as manifesting, resisting, and subverting patriarchy; and she hopes to mediate between, on the one hand, poststructuralist theories that discursive structures create the self and, on the other hand, humanist theories that individuals resist, transgress, and transform discourse. Drawing lucidly on Bakhtin, deconstruction, and cultural studies, Price Herndl's compelling individual readings of works by major writers (Harriet Beecher Stowe, Hawthorne, Wharton, James, Fitzgerald) and minor ones complement her examination of germ theory, psychic and somatic cures, medicine's place in the rise of capitalism, and the cultural forms--from fiction to advertisements to film--in which men and women used the trope of female illness. Advanced undergraduate; graduate; faculty. L. W. MacFarlane; University of New Hampshire
Reviews
Review Quotes
A fine example of politically engaged literary criticism.Belles Lettres
A fine example of politically engaged literary criticism. Belles Lettres
[An] important book.Nineteenth-Century Literature
[An] important book. Nineteenth-Century Literature
Compelling.Choice
Compelling. Choice
Rich and provocative. . . . A major contribution to the feminist agenda of literature and medicine.Medical Humanities Review
Rich and provocative. . . . A major contribution to the feminist agenda of literature and medicine. Medical Humanities Review
Sophisticated.Feminist Studies
Sophisticated. Feminist Studies
This item was reviewed in:
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Summaries
Long Description
A provocative study based on imaginative historical research and very fine close readings. The book provides a useful American complement to Helena Michie'sThe Flesh Made Wordand Margaret Homans'sBearing the World. It should prove enlightening and otherwise useful not just to scholars of American literature, but also to those engaged in American studies, feminist criticism and theory, women's studies, the sociology of medicine and illness, and the history of science and medicine.Cynthia S. Jordan, Indiana University
Main Description
A provocative study based on imaginative historical research and very fine close readings. The book provides a useful American complement to Helena Michie's The Flesh Made Word and Margaret Homans's Bearing the World . It should prove enlightening and otherwise useful not just to scholars of American literature, but also to those engaged in American studies, feminist criticism and theory, women's studies, the sociology of medicine and illness, and the history of science and medicine. Cynthia S. Jordan, Indiana University
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Introductionp. 1
Reading Illnessp. 5
Invalid Ideologyp. 8
Culture, Dialogue, and Discoursep. 11
Invalid Womenp. 16
Defining the Feminine/Defining the Invalid: Women and Medicine in the Mid-Nineteenth Centuryp. 20
Women's Health in the Mid-Nineteenth Centuryp. 23
Physicians and Womenp. 30
Medical Discourse, Cultural Definitionp. 38
The Threat of Invalidism: Responsibility and Reward in Domestic and Feminist Fictionp. 43
Fiction Figuring Womenp. 45
Invalid Mothersp. 50
The Feminist Invalidp. 64
(Super) "Natural" Invalidism: Male Writers and the Mind/Body Problemp. 75
The Domestic and the Romantic (Super)Naturalp. 76
The Mind/Body Problemp. 82
Making Natural Art of Womenp. 87
The Natural Pharmakon in the Gardenp. 94
A Return to the Garden: The Healthy Invalidp. 99
The "Feverish Poet"p. 106
The Writing Cure: Women Writers and the Art of Illnessp. 110
Mental Healing at the Turn of the Centuryp. 114
The Writing Curep. 123
The Art of Illnessp. 129
Happy Endingsp. 140
Fighting (with) Illness: Success and the Invalid Womanp. 150
Success, Class, and Healthp. 153
Failing Healthp. 165
Invalid Men and the Ideology of "Separate Spheres"p. 177
Economics of Illness: Working the Invalid Womanp. 184
Willpowerp. 186
Clinical Ethics and the Invalid Economyp. 201
Conclusion: Invalidism and the Female Body Politicp. 212
The Political Representation of Feminine Illnessp. 216
Notesp. 221
Bibliographyp. 245
Indexp. 263
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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