Catalogue


Whores of Babylon : Catholicism, gender, and seventeenth-century print culture /
Frances E. Dolan.
imprint
Ithaca : Cornell University Press, c1999.
description
xii, 231 p. : ill.
ISBN
080143629X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Ithaca : Cornell University Press, c1999.
isbn
080143629X
catalogue key
3377437
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-05-01:
Dolan (English, Miami Univ.) demonstrates how, in print sources, 17th-century English Protestants viewed Catholic women as disorderly and dangerous. Since compatriot Catholics professed a creed shared by England's political rivals, many literate Protestant men saw them as potential traitors, analogous to assertive women at home--domestically familiar but chaffing at control, deviously independent, and threatening to take over. Dolan's method is to closely analyze laws, dramas, tracts, and even playing cards related to three public events of Protestant-Catholic conflict: the Gunpowder Plot of 1605; the patronage of Catholicism by Henriette Maria, the consort of Charles I, in the 1630s and '40s; and the closely related Popish Plot and Meal Tub Plot of 1678-80. Dolan claims that it is the polemical language of these texts that forms the event in people's minds, regardless of what really happened. Despite the truth in this notion, one misses greater linkage of her selected texts to other contexts: how the genders related domestically and publicly beyond the printed word, the commercial and legal conditions for printing, and the religious and political struggles of the English Civil War, Protectorate, Restoration, and Glorious Revolution. Recommended for graduate students, researchers, and faculty. P. S. Spalding; Illinois College
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Choice, May 2000
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In the 17th century, largely Protestant England was preoccupied with its Catholic subjects. They inspired more criticism and attempts at regulation than did any other minority group. This work probes the representations of Catholics and Catholicism.
Main Description
In the seventeenth century, the largely Protestant nation of England was preoccupied with its Catholic subjects. They inspired more prolific and harsher criticism and more elaborate attempts at legal regulation than did any other minority group. To understand this phenomenon, Frances E. Dolan probes the verbal and visual representations of Catholics and Catholicism and the uses to which these were put during three crises in Protestant?Catholic relations: the gunpowder plot (1605), Queen Henrietta Maria's open advocacy of Catholicism in the 1630s and 1640s, and the popish and meal tub plots (1678?1680). She uses each crisis as a jumping-off point, an opportunity for speculation, as did contemporary writers. Drawing on political, religious, and legal writings and offering fresh readings of literary texts such as Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra, Dolan shows how often Catholics and Catholicism were linked to disorderly women. Dolan maintains that since Catholics were members of many English families and communities and prominent at court, the threat they offered was precisely that they could not be readily isolated and assigned to a category--both laws and polemic struggled to identify Catholics, but never succeeded in establishing a clear line between Catholics and everyone else. In seventeenth-century England, Dolan says, the threat of Catholicism lay in the tension between the foreign and the familiar, the different and the same.
Unpaid Annotation
In the seventeenth century, the largely Protestant nation of England was preoccupied with its Catholic subjects. They inspired more prolific and harsher criticism and more elaborate attempts at legal regulation than did any other minority group. To understand this phenomenon, Frances E. Dolan probes the verbal and visual representations of Catholics and Catholicism and the uses to which these were put during three crises in Protestant-Catholic relations: the gunpowder plot (1605), Queen Henrietta Maria's open advocacy of Catholicism in the 1630s and 1640s, and the popish and meal tub plots (1678-1680). She uses each crisis as a jumping-off point, an opportunity for speculation, as did contemporary writers. Drawing on political and legal writings and offering fresh readings of literary texts such as Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra, Dolan shows how often Catholics and Catholicism were linked to disorderly women.Dolan maintains that since Catholics were members of many English families and communities and prominent at court, the threat they offered was precisely that they could not be readily isolated and assigned to a category -- both laws and polemic struggled to identify Catholics, but never succeeded in establishing a clear line between Catholics and everyone else. In seventeenth-century England, Dolan says, the threat of Catholicism lay in the tension between the foreign and the familiar, the different and the same.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Home-Bred Enemies Imagining Catholicsp. 16
Searching the Bed: Jacobean Anti-Catholicism and the Scandal of Heterosocialityp. 45
The Command of Mary: Marian Devotion, Henrietta Maria's Intercessions, and Catholic Motherhoodp. 95
""The Wretched Subject the Whole Town Talks of Elizabeth Cellier, Popish Plots, and Printp. 157
Afterwordp. 211
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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