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Joyce in America : cultural politics and the trials of Ulysses /
Jeffrey Segall.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1993.
description
x, 208 p.
ISBN
0520077466 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1993.
isbn
0520077466 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3375171
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"I hold [Ulysses] to be the most important expression which the modern age has found . . . to which we are all indebted, and from which none of us can escape."--T.S. Eliot "A heap of dung, crawling with worms, photographed by a cinema apparatus through a microscope--such is Joyce's work."--Karl Radek
Flap Copy
"I hold [ Ulysses ] to be the most important expression which the modern age has found . . . to which we are all indebted, and from which none of us can escape."--T.S. Eliot "A heap of dung, crawling with worms, photographed by a cinema apparatus through a microscope--such is Joyce's work."--Karl Radek
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-03:
Segall's comparative survey of various camps of opinion about Ulysses breaks little new ground, but it excels in synthesizing and comparing critics' views and in noting how the book's reception often resulted from ideological special pleading. Segall chronologically analyzes several critical schools, both supportive and critical: attacks by quasi-fascists (Yeats, Eliot, Wyndham Lewis, Lawrence), Marxists, and conservative New Humanists (Paul Elmer More, Van Wyck Brooks, MacLeish); defenses by "anti-fascist liberals," Trotskyites (Edmund Wilson, James T. Farrell, Dwight Macdonald, William Barrett, Trilling), and the "ideal readers of Joyce," the New Critics (Tate, Ransom, Cleanth Brooks, Warren, Tindall, Blackmur, Levin). He also takes up the complex matter of Roman Catholic critics (notably Kenner); and, focusing on Ellmann and Scholes, these various schools' sense of Joyce's political awareness. Segall sees such controversial readings as springing "more directly from political polarization and moral prudery than from class snobbery," and he assesses the effect of these ideological pressures on Joyce's reputation. An astute synthesis and comparison of critics' views, with suggestive ways for readers to approach the novel and understand its greatness. Undergraduate; graduate; faculty. P. Schlueter; Warren County Community College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1994
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Summaries
Long Description
When James Joyce's Ulysses was first published in America, it quickly became a dynamic symbol of both modern art and the modern age. Jeffrey Segall skillfully demonstrates how various political, ideological, and religious allegiances influenced the critical reception and eventual canonization of what is perhaps the twentieth century's greatest novel. In re-creating the polemical debates that erupted, Segall provides a dramatic reminder of just how challenging and controversial Ulysses was--and is. Seventy years after Ulysses was first banned, the novel remains at the center of contemporary debates among feminist, neo-Marxist, and poststructuralist critics. Segall allows us the opportunity to view Ulysses from the perspective of its early readers, and he also elucidates key moments in recent American cultural history.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Polemics of Our Portraitsp. 1
"James Joyce or Socialist Realism?" Marxist Aesthetics and the Problem of Ulyssesp. 11
"Kulturbolschewismus Is Here": Joyce and American Cultural Conservatismp. 48
Between Marxism and Modernism: Joyce and the Dissident Leftp. 80
"On the Side of the Angels": Joyce and the New Criticsp. 115
The High Priest of Their Imagination: Joyce and His Catholic Criticsp. 137
Conclusion: The Politics of Parallax, or the Transubstantiation of Joyce's Political Soulp. 170
Notesp. 189
Works Citedp. 195
Indexp. 205
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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