Catalogue


Robert Louis Stevenson's Kidnapped, or, The lad with the silver button : the original text /
edited with an introduction and notes by Barry Menikoff.
imprint
San Marino, Calif. : Huntington Library, c1999.
description
lxvi, 334 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0873281772 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
genre index term
More Details
added author
imprint
San Marino, Calif. : Huntington Library, c1999.
isbn
0873281772 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3364705
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 279-311).
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1999-05-15:
While widely known and still read with great joy, Stevenson's novel, insists scholar Menikoff, has been unfairly relegated to young adult fiction. To remedy that, Menikoff has restored the text to its original form, reinstating deleted passages and reconstructing Stevenson's original punctuation. The text is buttressed with the same drawings that accompanied the story when serialized in the 19th century. In addition, Menikoff offers an introduction that explains the book's nexus and puts it into its Scottish cultural context. Undoubtedly one of the finest editions of Kidnapped ever offered. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1999-12-01:
Though Stevenson's Kidnapped is less well known than Treasure Island, after reading Menikoff's well-written and cogently argued introduction to this new edition, many will agree with Stevenson himself that Kidnapped is his finest achievement. Why the need for a new edition? Stevenson's manuscripts were notoriously difficult to decipher. Using the autograph in the Huntington, Menikoff (Univ. of Hawaii) reproduces for the first time the actual text as Stevenson wrote it. To this text he appends two copies of sample autograph pages; substantive and informed commentary on the various stylistic components and language, the Scottish historical context, the realism, and the humor; and 32 pages of explanatory notes, a glossary, and even a gazetteer. Knowledgeable, brief, and to the point, these materials do not obtrude: the context and understanding Menikoff provides is precisely what both the general reader and the most serious Stevenson student would desire. As a result, this carefully researched and meticulously prepared volume offers readers the ultimate standard text that a novel with the reputation of Kidnapped deserves. Highly recommended for libraries with readers from the general public through researchers. T. Loe; SUNY College at Oswego
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, May 1999
Choice, December 1999
Library Journal, January 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
"Robert Louis Stevenson always considered Kidnapped, the tale of 17-year-old David Balfour's adventures in the remote islands and highlands of Scotland with renegade soldier Alan Breck Stewart, to be his greatest novel, but when the classic adventure tale was published in 1886, it was without much of what."
Long Description
Robert Louis Stevenson always considered Kidnapped, the tale of 17-year-old David Balfour's adventures in the remote islands and highlands of Scotland with renegade soldier Alan Breck Stewart, to be his greatest novel, but when the classic adventure tale was published in 1886, it was without much of what its author held dear. His English publisher had excised many of the Scottish words and phrases he had used to evoke the suspense of the novel. From simple misreadings to deliberate revisions, subsequent printed editions represented major departures from Stevenson's handwritten text. Drawing on the unique autograph manuscript in the Huntington Library, Professor Barry Menikoff has faithfully reproduced the text as Stevenson originally wrote it, restoring the author's language and punctuation, as well as the authentic Scots quality of his diction. This handsome new edition of a novel, whose avowed purpose was the recovery of an important part of Scots history, reproduces for the first time the original drawings that accompanied the text during its serialization in Young Folks. Menikoff's substantial introduction situates the book in its cultural context and enables us to see why Stevenson's contemporaries were both entranced and awed by his achievement. In his extensive notes to the novel, he reveals Stevenson's enormous prestige as an authority on language, both English and Scots, for Kidnapped was widely drawn upon as a reference by lexicographers for the Oxford English Dictionary and the Scottish National Dictionary. Finally, for a tale that charts the "wanderings" of David Balfour over the land and seas of Scotland, this edition is the first to provide a gazetteer of place-names encountered during the course of those travels.
Long Description
Robert Louis Stevenson always consideredKidnapped, the tale of 17-year-old David Balfour's adventures in the remote islands and highlands of Scotland with renegade soldier Alan Breck Stewart, to be his greatest novel, but when the classic adventure tale was published in 1886, it was without much of what its author held dear. His English publisher had excised many of the Scottish words and phrases he had used to evoke the suspense of the novel. From simple misreadings to deliberate revisions, subsequent printed editions represented major departures from Stevenson's handwritten text. Drawing on the unique autograph manuscript in the Huntington Library, Professor Barry Menikoff has faithfully reproduced the text as Stevenson originally wrote it, restoring the author's language and punctuation, as well as the authentic Scots quality of his diction. This handsome new edition of a novel, whose avowed purpose was the recovery of an important part of Scots history, reproduces for the first time the original drawings that accompanied the text during its serialization inYoung Folks. Menikoff's substantial introduction situates the book in its cultural context and enables us to see why Stevenson's contemporaries were both entranced and awed by his achievement. In his extensive notes to the novel, he reveals Stevenson's enormous prestige as an authority on language, both English and Scots, forKidnappedwas widely drawn upon as a reference by lexicographers for theOxford English Dictionaryand theScottish National Dictionary. Finally, for a tale that charts the "wanderings" of David Balfour over the land and seas of Scotland, this edition is the first to provide a gazetteer of place-names encountered during the course of those travels.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem