Catalogue


The foreign woman in British literature : exotics, aliens, and outsiders /
edited by Marilyn Demarest Button and Toni Reed.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1999.
description
xix, 201 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0313309280 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1999.
isbn
0313309280 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3361765
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Marilyn Demarest Button is Associate Professor of English at Lincoln University, Pennsylvania Laurel Erickson is currently a lecturer in the Department of English at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Celia Esplugas is Associate Professor of Spanish at West Chester University, Pennsylvania John Greenfield is Associate Professor of English and Director of the Writing Program at McKendree College, Lebanon, Illinois Eleanor Harrington-Austin serves as Visiting Professor of English and Philosophy at North Carolina Central University in Durham, NC Karl Henzy is Assistant Professor of English at Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland Andrea O'Reilly Herrera is Assistant Professor of English at State University of New York, Fredonia, New York Oliver Lovesey is College Professor in the English Department of Okanagan University College, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada Mary Mathew is Assistant Professor of English at North Carolina Central University Ode S. Ogede is Associate Professor of English at North Carolina Central University Toni Reed taught English for several years at four universities Frank P. Riga is Professor of English at Canisius College, New York Eve W. Stoddard is Associate Professor of English and Gender Studies at St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York Maureen Thum teaches English and Honors at the University of Michigan, Flint
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-07-01:
No one could object to the aims of this collection, as stated by Reed, to provide "an opportunity for us to confront our own tendencies to include or exclude our neighbors"; nor is anyone likely to dispute Button's statement of the thesis, "that men individually and English society as a whole have alternatively and at times concurrently resisted and embraced the foreign woman." The anthology includes essays, some substantial and some comparatively slight, focusing on "exotic" or "alien" female characters in British literature since the Romantic period: their "foreignness" can refer to differences of nationality but also includes differences of ethnicity, appearance, gender identity, and social class. The strongest essays seem to address the "foreign" connection only peripherally, especially Eve W. Stoddard's "Genealogy of Ruths" in British literature, Maureen Thum's close reading of Aurora Leigh, and Laurel Erickson's extension of D. A. Miller's "queer" interpretation of The Woman in White. Other topics range from Byron and Shelley, through various Victorian novelists, to D. H. Lawrence, Laurence Durrell, and Anita Brookner. Celia Esplugas contributes a brief survey titled "Gypsy Women in English Life and Literature" that will answer many students' questions. For large collections serving upper-division undergraduates through faculty. R. R. Warhol; University of Vermont
Reviews
Review Quotes
"How have modern authors imagined the Other? For the past generation critics have served up confident answers to that question. This collection demonstrates that the reality may be more complicated than we imagined. These essays will upset quite a few stereotypes--particularly your own." - Jonathan Rose, PhD Professor of History, Drew University Author, The Edwardian Temperament
'œAn evocative book edited by Marilyn Demarest Button and Toni Reed is The Foreign Woman in British Literature Exotics, ALiens, and Outsiders. The range of topics and high quality of essays make this collection particularly readable.'' Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2000
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Summaries
Long Description
While England has been strengthened by a proud isolationism, she has simultaneously been enriched by the economic, social, and political complexities that have emerged as people of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds have moved within her borders, or when her own citizens have emigrated among those foreigners to live or rule. This book explores the foreign element in English culture and the attempt by English writers from the early 19th to the mid 20th century to portray their complex and often ambiguous responses to that doubly foreign element among them: the foreign woman. While being foreign may begin with national or ethnic difference, the contributors to this book expand it to include other forms of alienation from a dominant culture, resulting from gender, race, class, ideology, or temperament. The many factors shaping English national identityincluding British imperialism, immigration patterns, English family and social structures, and English common lawhave been shaped by gender-related issues. Though not a prominent literary figure, the foreign woman in England has received increasingly critical attention in recent years as a psychological and sociological phenomenon. By beginning with Byron in the early 19th century and concluding with Lawrence Durrell in the 20th century, this study contributes to a more comprehensive vision of the foreign woman as she is portrayed by a number of British authors, including Shelley, Wordsworth, Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Wilkie Collins, George Eliot, Joseph Conrad, D. H. Lawrence, and Anita Brookner.
Long Description
While England has been strengthened by a proud isolationism, she has simultaneously been enriched by the economic, social, and political complexities that have emerged as people of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds have moved within her borders, or when her own citizens have emigrated among those foreigners to live or rule. This book explores the foreign element in English culture and the attempt by English writers from the early 19th to the mid 20th century to portray their complex and often ambiguous responses to that doubly foreign element among them: the foreign woman. While being foreign may begin with national or ethnic difference, the contributors to this book expand it to include other forms of alienation from a dominant culture, resulting from gender, race, class, ideology, or temperament. The many factors shaping English national identity--including British imperialism, immigration patterns, English family and social structures, and English common law--have been shaped by gender-related issues. Though not a prominent literary figure, the foreign woman in England has received increasingly critical attention in recent years as a psychological and sociological phenomenon. By beginning with Byron in the early 19th century and concluding with Lawrence Durrell in the 20th century, this study contributes to a more comprehensive vision of the foreign woman as she is portrayed by a number of British authors, including Shelley, Wordsworth, Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Wilkie Collins, George Eliot, Joseph Conrad, D. H. Lawrence, and Anita Brookner.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. xiii
Dismantling Traditionalist Gender Roles: An Exotic Counter-World in Byron's Don Juanp. 1
Transforming the Stereotype: Exotic Women in Shelley's Alastor and The Witch of Atlasp. 17
"Asia Loves Prometheus": Asian Women and Shelley's Macropoliticsp. 27
A Genealogy of Ruths: From Alien Harvester to Fallen Woman in Nineteenth-Century Englandp. 45
Imagining a Self between a Husband or a Wall: Charlotte Bronte's Villettep. 67
Challenging Traditionalist Gender Roles: The Exotic Woman as Critical Observer in Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Aurora Leighp. 79
"In Short, She Is an Angel; and I Am--": Odd Women and Same-Sex Desire in Wilkie Collins's Woman in Whitep. 95
Tigresses, Tinsel Madonnas, and Citizens of the World: The "Other" Woman in George Eliot's Fictionp. 117
Phantoms Mistaken for a Human Face: Race and the Construction of the African Woman's Identity in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darknessp. 127
The Foreign Woman Is a Man: Gender Reversal in D. H. Lawrence's Fictionp. 139
Gypsy Women in English Life and Literaturep. 145
"Our Many Larval Selves": Durrell's Livia and the Cross-Cultural Signalp. 159
A Losing Tradition: The Exotic Female of Anita Brookner's Early Fictionp. 171
Afterwordp. 183
Indexp. 187
About the Contributorsp. 199
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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