Catalogue


Darkest Italy : the nation and stereotypes of the Mezzogiorno, 1860-1900 /
John Dickie.
imprint
New York : St. Martin's Press, c1999.
description
209 p. : ill.
ISBN
0312221681
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : St. Martin's Press, c1999.
isbn
0312221681
catalogue key
3361397
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
John Dickie is Lecturer in Italian Studies at University College London.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1999-11-01:
Defining a nation's identity can involve the use of an "other," a foreign and alien group to which the bourgeoisie can (favorably) compare themselves. For newly united Italy in the late 19th century, that group was its own southern inhabitants, especially Sicilians. Southerners were seen as violent, ill-mannered brigands and peasants, barely able to function in a civilized, industrialized society. Dickie (Italian studies, Univ. College, London) sketches aspects of this dialectic in four short essays, examining the objectification of southerners by politicians, writers, and the public at large. Dickie's tone is dense and theoretical enough to limit its audience to advanced scholars. Some of the sections are too narrow and specific, while others try to tackle too many topics too quickly. While some good points are made, the result is somewhat esoteric. For academic libraries with strong Italy collections only.ÄRobert Persing, Univ. of Pennsylvania Lib., Philadelphia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This interpretive study. . .is attractively well-written."--American Historical Review
"This interpretive study. . .is attractively well-written." --American Historical Review
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, November 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Stereotypical representations of the Mezzogiorno are a persistent feature of Italian culture at all levels. InDarkest Italy, John Dickie analyzes these stereotypes in the post-Unification period, when the Mezzogiorno was widely seen as barbaric, violent or irrational, an "Africa" on the European continent. At the same time, this is the moment when the Mezzogiorno became a metaphor for the state of the country as a whole, the index of Italy's modernity. Dickie argues that these stereotypes, rather than being a symptom of the failings of national identity in Italy, were actually integral to the way Italy's bourgeoisie imagined themselves as Italian. Drawing on recent theories of Otherness and national identity, Dickie brings a new light to an important and well-established area of Italian history--the relationship between the South and the nation as a whole.
Main Description
Stereotypical representations of the Mezzogiorno are a persistent feature of Italian culture at all levels. In Darkest Italy, John Dickie analyzes these stereotypes in the post-Unification period, when the Mezzogiorno was widely seen as barbaric, violent or irrational, an "Africa" on the European continent. At the same time, this is the moment when the Mezzogiorno became a metaphor for the state of the country as a whole, the index of Italy's modernity. Dickie argues that these stereotypes, rather than being a symptom of the failings of national identity in Italy, were actually integral to the way Italy's bourgeoisie imagined themselves as Italian. Drawing on recent theories of Otherness and national identity, Dickie brings a new light to an important and well-established area of Italian history--the relationship between the South and the nation as a whole.
Main Description
Stereotypical representations of the Mezzogiorno are a persistent feature of Italian culture at all levels. In Darkest Italy , John Dickie analyzes these stereotypes in the post-Unification period, when the Mezzogiorno was widely seen as barbaric, violent or irrational, an "Africa" on the European continent. At the same time, this is the moment when the Mezzogiorno became a metaphor for the state of the country as a whole, the index of Italy's modernity. Dickie argues that these stereotypes, rather than being a symptom of the failings of national identity in Italy, were actually integral to the way Italy's bourgeoisie imagined themselves as Italian. Drawing on recent theories of Otherness and national identity, Dickie brings a new light to an important and well-established area of Italian history--the relationship between the South and the nation as a whole.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
A Word at War: The Italian Army and Brigandagep. 25
The Birth of the Southern Questionp. 53
The Power of the Picturesque: Representations of the South in the Illustrazione Italianap. 83
Francesco Crispi's sicilianitap. 121
Conclusionp. 143
Notesp. 149
Bibliographyp. 189
Indexp. 203
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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