Catalogue


Christianity and politics in Doe's Liberia /
Paul Gifford.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1993.
description
xvi, 349 p. : map ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0521420296
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1993.
isbn
0521420296
catalogue key
3356771
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a chilling but vivid analysis of the role of the Christian church in Liberia....Overall this is an absorbing book, based on personal experience and a wide range of sources. It is, also, to say the least, contentious, particularly with regard to the strictures on American evangelists, past and present. Undoubtedly, this book is certainly bound to generate spirited debate in some circles." Felix K. Ekechi, African Studies Review
"...a must for all interested in African Christianty and politics and their interplay wth American Christianity and politics. Not only is this a representative case study but also a very wide-ranging one....To Paul Gifford and Cambridge University Press, a thousand thanks." Jan H. Boer, Calvin Theological Journal
"...a welcome addition to the literature on Liberia."D. Elwood Dunn, Journal of Church and State
"It is well written, clearly argued, and provides a very useful case study of African Christianity since the Pentecostal explosion." - American Historical Review
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This study examines the role of Christianity in Liberia under the corrupt rule of Samuel K. Doe (1980-90). Paul Gifford argues that the Church encouraged obedience and acceptance of the status quo and thus served to entrench Doe's power and promote US objectives in the region.
Main Description
This study examines the role of Christianity in Liberia under the corrupt regime of Samuel K. Doe (1980-1990). Paul Gifford shows that, in general, Liberian Christianity--far from being a force for justice and human advancement--diverted attention from the cause of Liberia's ills, left change to God's miraculous intervention, encouraged obedience and acceptance of the status quo, and thus served to entrench Doe's power. This Christianity, devised in and controlled from the United States, thus furthered regional American economic and political objectives, which were designed to support Doe's rule.
Main Description
This study examines the role of Christianity in Liberia under the corrupt rule of Samuel K. Doe (1980-90). Paul Gifford illustrates the relationship between mainline, evangelical, new Pentecostal and independent churches, and notes the strengths and weaknesses of each. He shows that, in general, Liberian Christianity - far from being a force for justice and human advancement - diverted attention from the causes of Liberia's ills, left change to God's miraculous intervention, encouraged obedience and acceptance of the status quo, and thus served to entrench Doe's power. In so doing, this Christianity, devised in the USA and promoted largely by American missionaries, helped to further the regional economic and political objectives of the US government which was committed to supporting Doe. The Lberian example is used to illustrate the difference between the kinds of Christianity to be found in Africa and in Latin America.
Description for Library
This study examines the role of Christianity in Liberia under the corrupt rule of Samuel K. Doe (1980-90). Paul Gifford shows that, in general, Liberian Christianity - far from being a force for justice and human advancement - diverted attention from the causes of Liberia's ills, left change to God's miraculous intervention, encouraged obedience and acceptance of the status quo, and thus served to entrench Doe's power. In so doing, this Christianity, devised in and controlled from the USA, furthered the regional economic and political objectives of the US government, which endorsed Doe's rule.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The historical context
The mainline churches
The evangelical churches
The faith gospel of health and wealth
The independent churches
The geopolitical context
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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