Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Persistent oligarchs : elites and politics in Chihuahua, Mexico, 1910-1940 /
Mark Wasserman.
imprint
Durham : Duke University Press, 1993.
description
x, 265 p. : map ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0822313294 (cl : acid-free paper) 0822313456 (pa : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Durham : Duke University Press, 1993.
isbn
0822313294 (cl : acid-free paper) 0822313456 (pa : acid-free paper)
catalogue key
3343090
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [241]-258) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-04:
Persistent Oligarchs is a sequel to Wasserman's Capitalists, Caciques, and Revolution (CH, Sep'84). This new endeavor allowed him to use the basic research and analysis of his previous work to explore central questions about both Chihuahua and the Mexican Revolution. The analytic focus of Persistent Oligarchs is on change in the social structure. Specifically, Wasserman examines the survival of the elite of the old regime, the rise of a new revolutionary elite, and the relations between the two in the postrevolutionary era, 1920 to 1940. This is the first book to study the pre- and post revolutionary elites in Mexico, and it greatly enhances understanding of the consequences of the Revolution. Wasserman concludes that the Chihuahuan elite survived the revolutionary ordeal and even prospered economically in postrevolutionary Mexico, but it did not regain direct political power. Those interested in the course of Mexican history and in the contemporary dilemmas facing the Mexican political system will find this an important study. Advanced undergraduates and above. D. Baldwin; University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 1994
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"No other comprehensive, comparative regional work on Chihuahua for the whole period has yet been published. Combined with the author's first book, this sequel provides one of the two most extended political histories of a Mexican state yet completed."-Stuart F. Voss, SUNY, Plattsburgh
Back Cover Copy
"Wasserman examines for the first time what the revolution did to the oligarchs of the old regime. . . His book breaks new ground for historians. Specialists interested in Mexico (historians, political scientists, cultural anthropologists) and those concerned with the nature of revolutions throughout the world will welcome this case study."-William H. Beezley, Texas Christian University
Main Description
Did the Mexican Revolution do away with the ruling class of the old regime? Did a new ruling class rise to take the old one's place-and if so, what differences resulted? In this compelling study, the first of its kind, Mark Wasserman pursues these questions through an analysis of the history and politics of the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua from 1910 to 1940. Chihuahua boasted one of the strongest pre-revolutionary elite networks, the Terrazas-Creel family. Wasserman describes this group's efforts to maintain its power after the Revolution, including its use of economic resources and intermarriage to forge partnerships with the new, revolutionary elite. Together, the old and new elites confronted a national government that sought to reestablish centralized control over the states and the masses. Wasserman shows how the revolutionary government and the popular classes, joined in opposition to the challenge of the elites, finally formalized into a national political party during the 1930s. Persistent Oligarchs concludes with an account of the Revolution's ultimate outcome, largely accomplished by 1940: the national government gaining central control over politics, the popular classes obtaining land redistribution and higher wages, and regional elites, old and new, availing themselves of the great opportunities presented by economic development. A complex analysis of revolution as a vehicle for both continuity and change, this work is essential to an understanding of Mexico and Latin America, as well as revolutionary politics and history.
Main Description
Did the Mexican Revolution do away with the ruling class of the old regime? Did a new ruling class rise to take the old one's place-and if so, what differences resulted? In this compelling study, the first of its kind, Mark Wasserman pursues these questions through an analysis of the history and politics of the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua from 1910 to 1940. Chihuahua boasted one of the strongest pre-revolutionary elite networks, the Terrazas-Creel family. Wasserman describes this group's efforts to maintain its power after the Revolution, including its use of economic resources and intermarriage to forge partnerships with the new, revolutionary elite. Together, the old and new elites confronted a national government that sought to reestablish centralized control over the states and the masses. Wasserman shows how the revolutionary government and the popular classes, joined in opposition to the challenge of the elites, finally formalized into a national political party during the 1930s. Persistent Oligarchsconcludes with an account of the Revolution's ultimate outcome, largely accomplished by 1940: the national government gaining central control over politics, the popular classes obtaining land redistribution and higher wages, and regional elites, old and new, availing themselves of the great opportunities presented by economic development. A complex analysis of revolution as a vehicle for both continuity and change, this work is essential to an understanding of Mexico and Latin America, as well as revolutionary politics and history.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
The Age of the Centaurp. 15
Chihuahua during the 1920s. The Era of the Caudillitosp. 31
Chihuahua during the 1930s. The Transition from Personalist to Party Rulep. 50
Persistent Oligarchs. The Old Elitep. 68
Freebooters. The New Elitep. 91
Local Notablesp. 119
Comparative Perspectivesp. 145
Appendix. Statistical Tablesp. 175
Notesp. 189
Bibliographyp. 241
Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem