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The trial of Madame Caillaux /
Edward Berenson.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1992.
description
xii, 296 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520073479 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1992.
isbn
0520073479 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
3337555
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-291) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"What a pleasure it is to read a book by a gifted writer whose exhaustive research results in such thought-provoking insights."--Deirdre Bair, author ofSimone de Beauvoir: A Biography
Flap Copy
"What a pleasure it is to read a book by a gifted writer whose exhaustive research results in such thought-provoking insights."--Deirdre Bair, author of Simone de Beauvoir: A Biography
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1991-12-20:
Berenson, professor of history at UCLA, writes a gender micro-history of the Belle Epoque in France (1890-1914) by examining the trial and acquittal of Madame Henriette Caillaux. On March 14, 1914 she fatally shot Gaston Calmette, editor of Le Figaro , motivated by the press campaign he was conducting against her husband, Joseph Caillaux, an influential left-wing cabinet minister. Utilizing courtroom transcripts and press coverage of the proceedings which riveted the attention of the nation, the author presents a carefully researched analysis that yields insights into the years when early feminism was beginning to affect social mores. Through the behavior and statements of the trial's participants, a societal portrait of the complex power relationship between men and women of the period emerges in this fine academic history. Illustrated. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 1992-09:
Drawing on a vast array of sources, Berenson reconstructs a dramatic moment in the history of the Third Republic: the trial of Henriette Caillaux. His work is a critique of French society during the Belle Epoque with emphasis on the role of gender and social class. By focusing on this sensational trial, the author examines the mores of French society. Charged with the murder of Gaston Calmette (editor of Le Figaro), a crime Madame Caillaux readily admitted at her trial, she was able literally to get away with murder because she successfully exploited the all-male court's condescending feelings toward women. Claiming typical female instability and weakness as a consequence of Calmette publishing her husband's love letters to a mistress, Caillaux argued that her act was a crime of passion. Although Berenson provides an innovative perspective on this affair, some of the issues in this case were also examined in Rudolph Binion's pioneering work, Defeated Leaders: The Political Fate of Caillaux, Jouvenel and Tardieu (1960), which Berenson cites. Berenson's book is notable because it is informed by feminist literature, giving it an appropriate contemporary flavor. College, university, and public libraries. J. Szaluta; United States Merchant Marine Academy
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews, December 1991
Publishers Weekly, December 1991
Booklist, February 1992
Choice, September 1992
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Edward Berenson recounts the trial of Henriette Caillaux, the wife of a powerful French cabinet minister, who murdered her husband's enemyLe Figaroeditor Gaston Calmette, in March 1914, on the eve of World War I. In analyzing this momentous event, Berenson draws a fascinating portrait of Belle Epoque politics and culture.
Main Description
Edward Berenson recounts the trial of Henriette Caillaux, the wife of a powerful French cabinet minister, who murdered her husband's enemy Le Figaroeditor Gaston Calmette, in March 1914, on the eve of World War I. In analyzing this momentous event, Berenson draws a fascinating portrait of Belle Epoque politics and culture.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Prologuep. 1
Henriette Caillaux and the Crime of Passionp. 13
Joseph Caillaux: The Politics of Personalityp. 43
Henriette Caillaux: Femininity, Feminism, and the Real Womanp. 89
Berthe Gueydan: The Politics of Divorcep. 133
Judge Albanel: Masculinity, Honor, and the Duelp. 169
Gaston Calmette: The Power and Venality of the Pressp. 208
Epiloguep. 240
Notesp. 249
Indexp. 293
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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