Catalogue


Urban patronage in early modern England : corporate boroughs, the landed elite, and the crown, 1580-1640 /
Catherine F. Patterson.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 1999.
description
viii, 337 p.
ISBN
0804735875 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 1999.
isbn
0804735875 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3324830
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Catherine F. Patterson is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Houston
Excerpts
Flap Copy
This study of politics in early modern England uses the relations between provincial towns, the landed elite, and the crown to argue that the growth of connections, as much as of conflict, explains the development of early modern government. Institutions provided a basic structure, but government relied on individuals and patronage for the articulation of political power. Patronage linked the powerful with the petitioners, enabling not only communication but also access and enforcement; personal connections made government work. This book shows the paradigmatic nature of patronage by examining how corporate towns adapted to new demands and needs by innovative use of personal connections. The author traces the networks of personal relationships that provided dynamic interaction between central and local government. Borough corporations used these connections to further local business, but in the process, they bound their localities more tightly to the English state. Cultivation of patronage relations with peers and gentry gave townsmen access to the halls of power. In return for political favor and practical service, corporators offered patrons deference and obedience, gifts and hospitality, and office and authority. Clients gained benefits, patrons acquired prestige, and the crown increased its power. The patterns of connection that helped shape the state are revealed in five thematic chapters and a case study, employing manuscript and printed records from over thirty provincial towns, from noble and gentle patrons, and from the central government from the 1580s to 1640. Rather than seeking independence or isolation from other authorities, corporate leaders worked to integrate themselves into the larger patterns of the state. Patronage offered a vital tool that suited both local needs and the royal will. Urban Patronage both illuminates the increasing cohesiveness of the English state and reveals the increasing stresses that plagued early Stuart government.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-05-01:
Modern Tudor-Stuart studies have generally stressed conflict between the towns of England and the world of the landed aristocracy. Patronage is seen as a code word masking an adversarial relationship in which each struggled to maintain its ancient rights. Patterson takes a more benevolent view, contending that patronage was "not a relationship of servility on the part of the town and domination on the part of the patron." This comprehensive study, researched in dozens of municipal archives, has collected hundreds of examples of fruitful relationships of benefit to both parties. Boroughs conferred the offices of recorder or high steward on local magnates or more distant court figures, which protected local interests at Whitehall. Each partner accepted the ground rules of this relationship whereby towns traded deference and obligation for aristocratic service and protection. Patrons mediated between the center and the locality. Although some remained aloof from their clients, many insinuated themselves into borough affairs, resolving internal conflicts. Patronage provided the "matrix" for integrating overlapping jurisdictions to maintain order in the realm. All worked well until government policies on taxation and religion undermined the system, which broke down after 1640. Patterson's study provides a fresh perspective on stability and governance in early modern England. Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. J. Kovarovic; Northwestern Oklahoma State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This work is an important contribution to our understanding of society and politics in early Modern England and will be an important resource for scholars and students of early modern English history."-- The Historian
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This study of politics in early modern England uses the relations between provincial towns, the landed elite, and the crown to argue that the growth of connections, as much as of conflict, explains the development of early modern government. Institutions provided a basic structure, but government relied on individuals and patronage for the articulation of political power. Patronage linked the powerful with the petitioners, enabling not only communication but also access and enforcement; personal connections made government work. This book shows the paradigmatic nature of patronage by examining how corporate towns adapted to new demands and needs by innovative use of personal connections. The author traces the networks of personal relationships that provided dynamic interaction between central and local government. Borough corporations used these connections to further local business, but in the process, they bound their localities more tightly to the English state. Cultivation of patronage relations with peers and gentry gave townsmen access to the halls of power. In return for political favor and practical service, corporators offered patrons deference and obedience, gifts and hospitality, and office and authority. Clients gained benefits, patrons acquired prestige, and the crown increased its power. The patterns of connection that helped shape the state are revealed in five thematic chapters and a case study, employing manuscript and printed records from over thirty provincial towns, from noble and gentle patrons, and from the central government from the 1580s to 1640. Rather than seeking independence or isolation from other authorities, corporate leaders worked to integrate themselves into the larger patterns of the state. Patronage offered a vital tool that suited both local needs and the royal will. Urban Patronageboth illuminates the increasing cohesiveness of the English state and reveals the increasing stresses that plagued early Stuart government.
Back Cover Copy
"This work is an important contribution to our understanding of society and politics in early Modern England and will be an important resource for scholars and students of early modern English history."The Historian
Back Cover Copy
"This work is an important contribution to our understanding of society and politics in early Modern England and will be an important resource for scholars and students of early modern English history."--The Historian
Unpaid Annotation
Patterson (history, University of Houston) uses the relations between provincial towns, the landed elite, and the crown to argue that the growth of these connections explains the development of early modern government. She illustrates how patronage linked the powerful with petitioners, and shows the paradigmatic nature of patronage by examining how corporate towns adapted to new demands by innovative use of personal connections, tracing networks of personal relationships between central and local government.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Corporations and Patronage: Making Connectionsp. 13
Patrons in the Locality: Creating the Basis for Obligationp. 48
Peacekeeping and Patrons: Finding Solutions for Civic Discordp. 87
Corporations and Competing Authorities: Resolving the Problem of Overlapping Jurisdictionsp. 120
Corporations and the Crown: Mediating the Interests of Center and Localityp. 155
Urban Patronage at Work: A Case Study of Leicester and the Earls of Huntingdonp. 194
Conclusionp. 233
Borough High Stewardships, 1580-1640p. 243
Abbreviationsp. 257
Notesp. 259
Bibliographyp. 311
Indexp. 329
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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