Catalogue


H.D. and Sapphic modernism, 1910-1950 /
Diana Collecott.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1999.
description
xiii, 350 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521550785 (hb)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1999.
isbn
0521550785 (hb)
catalogue key
3318884
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-06:
Hilda Doolittle, known to readers as H.D. after Ezra Pound launched her with those initials as an imagist poet in 1912, has attracted considerable scholarly attention recently; and Sappho is famously the prototypical feminine poet. Collecott's erudite study demonstrates how frequently a fragment by the poet of Lesbos resonates in the work of H.D., who was inspired by translations of Sappho but created her own versions in a kind of modernist collaboration. Collecott (Univ. of Durham, UK) includes a chart aligning passages in H.D.'s texts with these translations. The author shows H.D.'s debt to ancient Greece in the context of Victorian Hellenism and 20th-century works by Bryher, Amy Lowell, and Virginia Woolf, and she relates H.D.'s development as a woman and a writer to her interest in contemporary psychological theory and her psychoanalysis by Freud (who identified her bisexuality). Biographical and critical themes aside, what particularly interests Collecott is H.D.'s literary achievement--its denigration by male contemporaries, beginning with Pound, and its nurturing by women and influence on writers such as May Sinclair and Adrienne Rich. Includes an extensive bibliography of secondary works and photographs of H.D. at various ages. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. M. S. Vogeler; California State University, Fullerton
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...[an] erudite study..." M.S. Vogeler, Choice
"In its sustained scholarship, innovative theoretical exploration, and illuminating interpretation of H.D's writing, Diana Collecott's study represents a significant and impressive accomplishment, and will certainly alter permanently the way in which H.D. is read. The importance of H.D. and Sapphic Modernism is in laying open many dimensions of H.D.'s Sapphic intertextuality, especially the profound cultural, political, and artistic implications of Sapphism in the early twentieth century. This entails the recovery of an intricate and dense network of women writers, whose literary project and whose whole conception of intellectual exchange was distict from the climate of early modernism and its male collaborators." Eileen Gregory
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2000
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Summaries
Main Description
The American poet H. D. (1886-1961) is increasingly being recognized as a key figure in the shaping of Anglo-American modernism, and this study attempts to emphasize her position, against the well-established claims of writers such as T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound. The study is grounded in questions of sexuality, gender and the nature of subjectivity and H. D.'s interest in Hellenism. The development of a homoerotic strand within her distinctively modernist poetics comes together in Collecott's central concept of "sapphic modernism."
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study undertakes a radical revision of H.D.'s Hellenism and her imagism, relating both to the literary and sexual politics of the World War I period.
Description for Bookstore
A key figure in the shaping of Anglo-American modernism, this study attempts to emphasise H. D.’s position against the well-established claims of writers like T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound. The study is grounded in questions of sexuality, gender and the nature of subjectivity and H. D.’s interest in Hellenism.
Description for Bookstore
Diana Collecott proposes that Sappho's presence in H. D.'s work is as significant as that of Homer in Pound's and of Dante in Eliot's. She undertakes a radical revision of H. D.'s Hellenism and her Imagism, relating both to the literary and sexual politics of the First World War period.
Description for Bookstore
The American poet H. D. (1886-1961) is increasingly being recognised as a key figure in the shaping of Anglo-American modernism, and this study attempts to emphasise her position, against the well-established claims of writers like T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound. The study is grounded in questions of sexuality, gender and the nature of subjectivity and H. D.'s interest in Hellenism: the development of a homoerotic strand within her distinctively modernist poetics comes together in Collecott's central concept of 'sapphic modernism'.
Main Description
Diana Collecott proposes that Sappho’s presence in H. D.’s work is as significant as that of Homer in Pound’s, and Dante’s in Eliot’s. She undertakes a radical revision of H. D.’s Hellenism and her imagism, relating both to the literary and sexual politics of the First World War period. She then pursues H. D.’s career to the end of the Second World War, discovering en route important intertextualities with Swinburne, Wilde and Shakespeare. Connecting the fragmentary condition of Sappho’s writings with the erasure of women within modernism, and the silencing of lesbians in the wider culture, she traces the Sapphic in H. D.’s prose and poetry, and in its modern contexts. Her exploration develops a lesbian poetics not only for H. D., but also for contemporaries such as Bryer, Amy Lowell and Virginia Woolf, and for successors such as Andre Lorde, Adrienne Rich and Olga Broumas.
Main Description
Diana Collecott proposes that Sappho's presence in H. D.'s work is as significant as that of Homer in Pound's and of Dante in Eliot's.
Main Description
Diana Collecott proposes that Sappho's presence in H. D.'s work is as significant as that of Homer in Pound's and of Dante in Eliot's. She undertakes a radical revision of H. D.'s Hellenism and her Imagism, relating both to the literary and sexual politics of the First World War period. She then pursues H.D.'s career to the end of the Second World War, discovering en route important intertextualities with Swinburne, Wilde and Shakespeare. Connecting the fragmentary condition of Sappho's writings with the erasure of women within modernism and the silencing of lesbians in the wider culture, she traces the Sapphic in H.D.'s prose and poetry an in its modern contexts. Her exploration develops a lesbian poetics not only for H.D. but also for contemporaries such as Bryher, Amy Lowell and Virginia Woolf and for successors such as Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich and Olga Broumas.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Foreword: Sappho, Sapphic, Saph
A life of being: negotiating gender
The perfect bi-: negotiating sexuality
Straight as the Greek: Hellenism and Modernism
The art of the future: her emergence from Imagism
What is (not) said: lesbian poetics
Re-membering Shakes-pear: negotiations with tradition
Afterword: at the crossroads
Notes
Works cited
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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