Catalogue


Revolution from above, rebellion from below : the agrarian Transvaal at the turn of the century /
Jeremy Krikler.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1993.
description
xi, 261 p. : maps.
ISBN
0198203802
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1993.
isbn
0198203802
catalogue key
3301818
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-03:
Some readers will be put off by the early part of this book, which appears to be more concerned with demonstrating the validity of Marxist historical philosophy than with the events with which Krikler is purportedly dealing. However, perseverance reveals a work of considerable historical depth and impressive archival work. The author marshals convincing evidence to show that Africans in the Transvaal regarded the Anglo-Boer war of 1899-1902 as their cause, used the opportunity to recover land and to avoid labor services and taxation, and mistakenly regarded the British as liberators from Afrikaner racial oppression. Postwar reconstruction by the British thus came as a disillusionment; the conquerors were determined to build a much more efficient state, dedicated to maintaining the Boer farming community in place, supporting the gold mining industry, and providing both with African labor. Krikler shows that the British were only partially successful in this revolution from above, and that African peasants responded with many evasive techniques to preserve at least some of the gains of the war. Advanced undergraduates and above. J. E. Flint; Dalhousie University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[A] pleasure to read, partly because of Krikler's considerable literary gifts, but mainly because of the richness of human historical detail, based on an exhaustive mining of the archival sources. This is a vivid portrait of a rural world and a valued contribution to southern African agrarian history."--American Historical Review "A work of considerable depth and impressive archival work."--Choice
"[A] pleasure to read, partly because of Krikler's considerable literary gifts, but mainly because of the richness of human historical detail, based on an exhaustive mining of the archival sources. This is a vivid portrait of a rural world and a valued contribution to southern African agrarian history."-- American Historical Review "A work of considerable depth and impressive archival work."-- Choice
'thoroughly researched and well written ... It provides valuable insights on how ordinary folk reacted to the political changes taking place around them and shows how fragile was the Boer hold upon much of the land in the aftermath of their defeat. 'Stuart Jones, University of South Africa, African Affairs'What is new about Krikler's contribution is the theoretical significance which he attaches to black involvement ... the chapters detailing the processes of historical change in agriculture make for fascinating reading. Revolution from Above, Rebellion from Below is a solid, vigorously Marxist addition to a now long list of studies on South Africa's agrarian history. The arguments are forcefully constructed and the book ... is well presented ...essential reading for those interested in the history of the Transvaal after the South African War.'Wayne Dooling, Cambridge University, Southern African Review of Books, Vol. 6, No 1, Issue 29, January/February 1994'This is a well written, interesting and coherent book.'Stefan Schirmer, University of Witwatersrand, African Studies, Volume 53, No. 1, 1994'fine monograph... There is a sharply perceptive and enquiring mind at work here. krikler's commitment to the application of Marxist theory is married to an impressive and painstaking attention to research and to empirical detail. This is undoubtedly an important and welcome addition to what is already; a rich thicket of work on the rural history of Southern Africa.'Timothy Keegan, Journal of African History, Vol. 35, 1994'it is somewhat refreshing to read a book that is audaciously materialist and unabashedly political...He has unearthed some fascinating evidence...These are powerful, even seductive, arguments, presented clearly and with great confidence.'Journal of Social History'He writes graphically, and ably illustrates the greater range and scope of British intervention in the social, economic and technical spheres. We are well-guided through peasant and tenant reactions.'William Beinart, University of Bristol, EHR Apr. 96
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1994
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Summaries
Long Description
This is a study of rural life and struggle in the Transvaal during the watershed period of the 1890s and 1900s. Though much has been written about the South African War, this is the first scholarly and comprehensive analysis of its impact on agrarian relations and agrarian production. Krikler examines Afrikaner farming methods and tenantry systems, traces the wartime "peasants' revolt", and explores the agricultural modernization attempted by the British after the war. It is an original, thoroughly researched and lucidly written account, which illuminates our understanding of the South African War and its aftermath, and offers new insights into peasant societies during the colonial period.
Long Description
This is a study of rural society and struggle in the Transvaal during the watershed period of the early twentieth century. Though much has been written about the South African War and 'Reconstruction' period, this is the first scholarly and comprehensive analysis of their impact on the agrarian Transvaal. Jeremy Krikler analyses the 'Revolution from Above' unleashed by British imperialism as it wrought changes of immense significance for thecountryside. He explores the relationships between landowners and peasants, traces the struggle between them, and examines the agrarian changes attempted by the British after the war. It is an original, thoroughly researched, and lucidly written account, which illuminates our understanding of theSouth African War and its aftermath. It also offers new insights into peasant struggles, and into the nature of private property and the colonial state in the Transvaal.
Table of Contents
Maps
List of Abbreviations
Agrarian Class Struggle and the South African Warp. 1
The Restoration of Class Rule in the Countrysidep. 37
Mutations in the Agrarian Orderp. 64
The Agrarian Class Structure of the Post-War Transvaalp. 93
The Struggle over Taxp. 137
Struggles over Land and Labourp. 176
Conclusionp. 220
App. A: The Size of the Black Agrarian Working Classes on Private Property in the Early Twentieth-Century Transvaalp. 236
App. B: Wage-Rates for Black Farm Workers in the Early Twentieth-Century Transvaalp. 240
Referencesp. 243
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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