Catalogue


Archipelago : the islands of Indonesia : from the nineteenth-century discoveries of Alfred Russel Wallace to the fate of forests and reefs in the twenty-first century /
Gavan Daws and Marty Fujita ; prologue by Edward O. Wilson ; epilogue by John C. Sawhill.
imprint
Berkeley ; Los Angeles ; London : University of California Press, 1999.
description
xii, 254 p. : col. ill., maps
ISBN
0520215761, 9780520215764
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley ; Los Angeles ; London : University of California Press, 1999.
isbn
0520215761
9780520215764
general note
"Published in association with the Nature Conservancy" -- t.p.
local note
Fisher copy: With dust jacket.
catalogue key
3300592
 
Gift; Garrett Herman; 2017; RB346947.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"The narrative is extraordinary for its storytelling quality, making even the collection of beetles seem like high adventure." --Frank Stewart, author ofA Natural History of Nature Writing "Alfred Russel Wallace was a great field biologist, a heroic pioneer, and a peculiar but extraordinarily decent man--altogether, one of the most appealing scientific figures of the past two centuries. In the Malay Archipelago he found a world of wonders that led him toward wondrous insights. Gavan Daws and Marty Fujita have done a fine service by putting those two--the man and the archipelago--into one big frieze. This is a lovely, valuable book."--David Quammen, author ofThe Song of the Dodo, Wild Thoughts from Wild Places,andNatural Acts
Flap Copy
"The narrative is extraordinary for its storytelling quality, making even the collection of beetles seem like high adventure." --Frank Stewart, author of A Natural History of Nature Writing "Alfred Russel Wallace was a great field biologist, a heroic pioneer, and a peculiar but extraordinarily decent man--altogether, one of the most appealing scientific figures of the past two centuries. In the Malay Archipelago he found a world of wonders that led him toward wondrous insights. Gavan Daws and Marty Fujita have done a fine service by putting those two--the man and the archipelago--into one big frieze. This is a lovely, valuable book."--David Quammen, author of The Song of the Dodo, Wild Thoughts from Wild Places, and Natural Acts
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-05-01:
Historian Daws and researcher Fujita (Smithsonian) successfully integrate the story of Alfred Russel Wallace's travels to the tropical archipelagoes of the East Indies--including his development as a naturalist and evolutionist--with a description of the natural wonders of present-day Indonesia and the ongoing destruction of its landscape and wildlife. The work contains an excellent account of Wallace's life and earlier travels to South America, but it is concerned primarily with his eight-year exploration of the natural history of the archipelagoes; i.e., how he developed the concept of zoogeography and "Wallace's Line." Also, the influence of Charles Darwin's discoveries in natural history on Wallace's development as a naturalist is explored as well as how Wallace's independent formulation of a similar evolutionary theory prodded Darwin to publish his own ideas on evolution. The book is filled with wonderful color photographs of the Indonesian landscape, including examples of wildlife, particularly orangutans, illustrations and drawings highlighting Wallace's life and journeys, and photographs revealing the recent damage done to the environment. An important book not only for historians of science, environmentalists, and naturalists, but also for those concerned about the issues it raises. General readers; upper-division undergraduates through professionals. J. S. Schwartz; CUNY College of Staten Island
Appeared in Library Journal on 2000-01-01:
The Indonesian archipelago was the natural laboratory of 19th-century naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace who developed the theory of evolution at the same time as and independently of Charles Darwin. This lavishly illustrated book traces his explorations and comments on the biodiversity crisis that will affect the 21st century. The authors (Daws is a historian and Fujita is founding director of The Nature Conservancy's Indonesia program) do a fine job of interspersing excerpts from Wallace's journals and papers, along with their narrative of his exploits, with modern descriptions of flora, fauna, and conservation needs. Chapters dealing with individual islands, or groups of islands, begin with Wallace's experiences there and continue to current descriptions of conditions and concerns. The magnificent color photographs work well to support the text. This book serves as an urgent call for awareness and conservation of these unique and important islands. Useful in many subject collections, including evolution, biodiversity, natural history, and travel, and suitable for all public libraries.--Nancy J. Moeckel, Miami Univ. Libs., Oxford, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, January 2000
Choice, May 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This account of a true explorer covers the time of Wallace's 19th century discoveries in biogeography to the looming biodiversity of the 21st century.
Publisher Fact Sheet
A survey of twin paradoxes, Indonesia's grandeur & environmental degradation, & Wallace & Darwin's simultaneous theories explaining the origins of life.
Long Description
The Indonesian archipelago is a land of timeless natural beauty that in the twenty-first century faces unprecedented environmental degradation. It was also the biological laboratory of Alfred Russel Wallace, who, working independently of Charles Darwin, discovered the theory of evolution by natural selection. Wallace, who traveled for eight years in the archipelago, was one of the greatest field naturalists and nature writers of his century. No one was more skilled in observing and describing living things. A prodigious collector, he was the first to bring living birds of paradise to the West. And he was a great thinker, a theorist as formidable as any on earth. This magnificent account of a true explorer sweeps from the time of Wallace's nineteenth-century discoveries in biogeography to the looming biodiversity crisis of the twenty-first century--from the exploration of natural wonders to the exploitation of natural resources. The result is a history that powerfully portrays the intricate connections of human life and natural life. This unique story, published by the University of California Press in cooperation with The Nature Conservancy, is resplendently presented with maps, archival materials, and more than 200 color photographs. A portion of the proceeds from this book will go toward conservation efforts in Indonesia
Main Description
From the 19th-century discoveries of Alfred Russell Wallace to the fate of forests and reefs in the 21st century, examine the beauty and grace of Indonesian Islands. 211 color illustrations. Maps, photos and line drawings.
Table of Contents
List of Maps
Acknowledgments
Prologue
The Evolution of a Naturalistp. 3
The Naturalist's Cabinetp. 22
Preparing for the Archipelagop. 27
Wallace's Biological Laboratoryp. 37
Borneo: Encountering the Orangutanp. 42
Evolution's Panoplyp. 54
The Wild Man of the Forestp. 67
Bali, Lombock, and Celebes: Wallace Draws the Linep. 75
Wallace's Vision of Continentsp. 82
Sulawesi: Island Enigmap. 86
The Moluccas: Illness and Inspirationp. 99
Marine Biodiversityp. 113
Darwin, Wallace, and Precedencep. 124
The Islands of Ke, Aru, and New Guinea: Land of the Bird of Paradisep. 131
Ecology and Behavior of Birds of Paradisep. 154
Java, Sumatra, and Home: Realizationsp. 161
From the Malay Archipelago to Indonesia: Spanning the Centuriesp. 185
Conservation of Indonesia's Biodiversityp. 220
Epiloguep. 228
Appendix of Common and Scientific Namesp. 231
Notesp. 235
Selected Bibliographyp. 241
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem