Catalogue


Abraham Lincoln : a constitutional biography /
George Anastaplo.
imprint
Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c1999.
description
x, 373 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0847694313 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c1999.
isbn
0847694313 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3292428
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 263-359) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
George Anastaplo is professor of law at Loyola University of Chicago, lecturer in the liberal arts at the University of Chicago, and professor emeritus at Dominican University. He lives in Chicago, Illinois.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1999-11-01:
Given the number of books on Abraham Lincoln already published, is another justified? Especially when more than half its chapters have been previously published, it raises more questions than it answers, and it is initially difficult to read as it explores the common-law sources of Lincoln's jurisprudence. Despite these potential weaknesses, prolific University of Chicago law professor Anastaplo successfully carves a niche in the crowded collection of Lincolniana. Anastaplo has spent more than three decades assessing American democracy's icon by focusing on the sources, styles, and legacy of Lincoln's constitutional perspective, which might be reduced to the two words most repeated by the author: prudent equality. The chapter on the Gettysburg Address is a classic. A paperback edition is merited so that it may be widely used in constitutional law and Civil War courses. Highly recommended.ÄWilliam D. Pederson, Louisiana State Univ., Shreveport (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1999-11-22:
Much has been written about Lincoln the wartime leader, Lincoln the emancipator and Lincoln the orator. Anastaplo (The Amendments to the Constitution: A Commentary), who teaches at several Chicago universities, tackles Lincoln the constitutional scholar. What, wonders Anastaplo, can close study of Lincoln's presidential addresses, messages and proclamations reveal about the complex matrix of thought that provided the ethical and legal foundation for Lincoln's public actions? Drawing not just on Lincoln's statements but also on the writings of philosophers (ranging from Aristotle to Theodore Parker) whom Lincoln is known to have read and respected, Anastaplo vividly reveals the 16th president's interpretation of the values expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights. Covering some of the same ground traversed in Garry Wills's Lincoln at Gettysburg, Anastaplo casts a slightly wider net by giving equal interpretative attention to the Gettysburg Address, the Emancipation Proclamation, the two inaugural addresses, the "House Divided" speech and Lincoln's statements during his famous debates with Stephen A. Douglas. All this makes for a remarkable portrait of Lincoln as a political philosopher whose thinking was always more subtle than his back-country myth implied. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 2000-04:
Contrary to its misleading title, this book is not a Lincoln biography but rather an anthology of Anastaplo's essays on themes often linked to Lincoln tangentially at best. Nearly all of the 19 were lectures delivered to campus or community groups; most of those later published were in third-tier law reviews. Although the majority of the essays are of relatively recent vintage, most citations of post-1960 scholarship are of the author's own publications. Nowhere in the notes does one find such names as Benjamin Thomas, David Donald, James McPherson, Mark E. Neely Jr., Michael Burlingame, or Herman Belz. Yet many of Anastaplo's philosophical musings are more than worthy of the patience required of the reader. Especially cogent is his appraisal of Lincoln's conservative legacy of preserving the integrity of constitutional restraints and the purity of American political language in an era of turmoil and social revolution. Graduate, faculty. R. A. Fischer; University of Minnesota--Duluth
Reviews
Review Quotes
This provocative book offers a rich retrospective of the musings of George Anastaplo, one of our foremost political thinkers.
A stimulating examination of principled leadership more edifying than the gladiators currently performing in the Colosseum of American politics.
Lincoln grappled with major constitutional issues. It is fascinating to see constitutional scholar George Anastaplo grapple with Lincoln grappling with constitutional issues.
The finest scholarly writing on Lincoln's words that I know. My feeling is that Anastaplo must have sat at Lincoln's elbow as he composed the Proclamation of September 1862, and discussed it with him, paragraph by paragraph. As a proof of the possibility that one can understand a great writer as he understood himself, it is the definitive refutation of historicism.
The mature product of a lifetime of reflection on Lincoln, Anastaplo brings to the study of America's deepest president a rare combination of philosophic depth, practical sense, and sensitivity to constitutional issues. Both inclination and study have taught Anastaplo to think like Lincoln.
Successfully carves a niche in the crowded collection of Lincolniana.
The essays reflect the perspectives Anastaplo has gained in the course of a long, distinguished, and highly productive career as a teacher and scholar of the law, political science, and philosophy. They address enduring questions about government, polity, and the challenge of balancing a desire to promote morality and ideals against political realities. Students of philosophy, political science, and the law will indeed find much food for thought here.
This beautifully written book offers the considered judgments of a penetrating, judicious, and temperate mind concerning the American constitutional order and its most far-sighted and deeply prudential defender and representative, Abraham Lincoln. Anastaplo's lucid and perceptive essays, combining philosophical insight and historical sensitivity to the exigencies of political context, encourage in the reader both an awareness of and a disposition toward qualities of moral excellence required in a well ordered republican polity.
The writings of George Anastaplo have as one of their main purposes the attempt to teach Americans how to maintain their freedom with justice and moderation. These essays on Lincoln's constitutional thought are among the finest lessons one can have on the art of republican statesmanship.
A remarkable portrait of Lincoln as a political philosopher whose thinking was always more subtle than his back-country myth implied.
Anastaplo's reflections pay Lincoln the highest compliment: they show how, by taking Lincoln seriously as a political theorist and practitioner, readers can take their own responsibilites as citizens more seriously. Consistently insightful and thought-provoking, offering sensible interpretations of Lincoln's political craft.
Anastaplo's collection . . . has real value. Most notably, Anastaplo does an excellent job of outlining the rational basis behind several of Lincoln's key ideas. The admiration for Lincoln's prudence and constitutional scruples so apparent in these collected essays, coming as they do from someone who suffered greatly during an era when such values were largely absent, endows this book with a special poignancy.
Anastaplo produced a meditation on American politics, Platonic in its focus virtue, historical in its emphasis on prudence, modern in its suggestion that equality is the major continuing problem in American law and social structures--it is, in short, the product of a life-time's thought about the American polity.
Anastaplo illustrates in this original and stimulating work that Lincoln based his political principles on a deep and abiding faith in popular government. Lincoln scholars, Civil War buffs, and well-informed general readers will find much that is revealing here.
Abraham Lincoln examines Lincoln's thought and philosophy through several important texts. Anastaplo's strategy of examining public documents to understand a political figure is a fruitful one.
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, November 1999
Library Journal, November 1999
Publishers Weekly, November 1999
Choice, April 2000
Reference & Research Book News, August 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Renowned scholar George Anastaplo describes a side of Abraham Lincoln that previous biographers have overlooked: the development and legacy of his legal and constitutional thought.
Long Description
Renowned scholar George Anastaplo describes a side of Abraham Lincoln that previous biographers have overlooked: the development and legacy of his legal and constitutional thought. With eloquent insights into Lincoln's intellect and the issues dividing the country he led, Anastaplo describes how the 16th president successfully managed the impossible task of keeping the world's greatest democracy united. Anastaplo also demonstrates Lincoln's continuing and profound influence on modern American society, law, and politics, and he shows readers the lessons this fascinating man can still teach Americans about coping with our own divisive times.
Publisher Fact Sheet
Describes a side of Abraham Lincoln that previous biographers have overlooked: the development & legacy of his legal & constitutional thought. With eloquent insights into Lincoln's intellect & the issues dividing the country he led the author describes how the 16th president successfully managed the impossible task of keeping the world's greatest democracy united. He also demonstrates Lincoln's continuing & profound influence on modern American society, law, & politics, & shows readers the lessons this fascinating man can still teach Americans about coping with our own divisive times.
Table of Contents
Prologuep. 1
The Declaration of Independence: An Introductionp. 11
The Declaration of Independence: On Rights and Dutiesp. 31
The Northwest Ordinancep. 39
Slavery and the Federal Convention of 1787p. 51
The Common Law and the Organization of Governmentp. 69
Alexis de Tocqueville on Democracy in Americap. 81
John C. Calhoun and Slaveryp. 113
Southern Illinois's Abraham Lincolnp. 123
The Poetry of Abraham Lincolnp. 135
The "House Divided" Speechp. 149
The Lincoln-Douglas Debatesp. 157
The First Inaugural Addressp. 177
The Fourth of July Message to Congressp. 185
The Emancipation Proclamationp. 197
The Gettysburg Addressp. 229
The Second Inaugural Addressp. 243
Abraham Lincoln's Legaciesp. 251
Epiloguep. 257
Notesp. 263
Indexp. 361
About the Authorp. 373
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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