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The new new thing : a Silicon Valley story /
Michael Lewis.
imprint
New York : W. W. Norton, 2000.
description
268 p.
ISBN
0393048136
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : W. W. Norton, 2000.
isbn
0393048136
catalogue key
3264776
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Michael Lewis is the author of several books, including the international bestseller Liar's Poker. He has been the American editor of the British weekly The Spectator and a senior editor at The New Republic. Currently a visiting fellow at the University of California-Berkeley, Lewis lives in Berkeley with his wife, Tabitha Soren, and their newborn daughter.
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Helen Bernstein Book Award, USA, 2000 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1999-12-01:
Acclaimed journalist Lewis does for Silicon Valley in the Nineties what his previous best seller, Liar's Poker, did for Wall Street in the Eighties. The book is threefold in scope. First, it offers an insightful look at the life and career of Dr. Jim Clark, the eccentric but brilliant visionary who thus far has created three multi-billion-dollar ground-breaking enterprises--Silicon Graphics, Netscape, and Healtheon. Second, it gives an insider's look at how the concept of the "new new thing" has been translated into an actionable product by key players in the game. Finally, it presents a social history of Silicon Valley, which has become the primary driver for worldwide social, economic, and political change. Although a little slow at times, this book is a great read and tells a compelling story. Highly recommended for both academic and public libraries. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 6/1/99.]--Norman B. Hutcherson, Beale Memorial Lib., Bakersfield, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1999-09-27:
While it purports to look at the business world of Silicon Valley through the lens of one man, that one man, Jim Clark, is so domineering that the book is essentially about Clark. No matter: Clark is as successful and interesting an example of Homo siliconus as any writer is likely to find. Lewis (Liar's Poker) has created an absorbing and extremely literate profile of one of America's most successful entrepreneurs. Clark has created three companiesÄSilicon Graphics, Netscape (now part of America Online) and HealtheonÄeach valued at more than $1 billion by Wall Street. Lewis was apparently given unlimited access to Clark, a man motivated in equal parts by a love of the technology he helps to create and a desire to prove something to a long list of people whom he believes have done him wrong throughout his life (especially his former colleagues at Silicon Graphics). As Lewis looks at the various roles of venture capitalists, entrepreneurs and programmers and at how these very different mindsets fit together in the anatomy of big deals, he gives readers a sense of how the Valley works. But the heart of the book remains Clark, who simultaneously does everything from supervise the creation of what may be the world's largest sloop to creating his fourth company (currently in the works). Lewis does a good job of putting Clark's accomplishments in context, and if he is too respectful of Clark's privacy (several marriages and children are mentioned but not elaborated on), he provides a detailed look at the professional life of one of the men who have changed the world as we know it. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
[A] superb book....[Lewis] makes Silicon Valley as thrilling and intelligible as he made Wall Street in his best-selling Liar's Poker .
It is a splendid, entirely satisfying book, intelligent and fun and revealing and troubling in the correct proportions, resolutely skeptical but not at all cynical...
Michael Lewis takes readers inside the now-familiar world of Silicon Valley excess, the frantic deal making, the absurdly hyped expectations, the phenomenal wealth. But the 39-year old best-selling author of Liar's Poker and The Money Culture brings something genuinely exotic to the mix: near-total access to one of the Valley's biggest and most enigmatic players.
[R]emarkable....Clark proves to be a character as enthralling as any in American fiction or non-fiction....Lewis tells a great story in this book, with prose that ranges from the beautiful to the witty to the breathtaking.
The most significant business story since the days of Henry Ford... Lewis achieves a novelistic elegance.
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, June 1999
Publishers Weekly, September 1999
Booklist, October 1999
Globe & Mail, October 1999
Kirkus Reviews, October 1999
New York Times Book Review, October 1999
San Francisco Chronicle, October 1999
USA Today, October 1999
Wall Street Journal, October 1999
Washington Post, October 1999
Chicago Tribune, November 1999
USA Today, November 1999
Library Journal, December 1999
New York Times Book Review, January 2001
USA Today, January 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Despite the variety of his achievements, Clark thinks of himself mainly as the creator of Hyperion, which happens to be a sailboat . . . not just an ordinary yacht, but the world's largest single-mast vessel, a machine more complex than a 747. Clark claims he will be able to sail it via computer from his desk in San Francisco, and the new code may contain the seeds of his next billion-dollar coup. On the wings of Lewis's celebrated storytelling, the reader takes the ride of a lifetime through this strange landscape of geeks and billionaires. We get the inside story of the battle between Netscape and Microsoft; we sit in the room as Clark tries to persuade the investment bankers that Healtheon is the next Microsoft; we get queasy as Clark pits his boat against the rage of the North Atlantic in winter. And in every brilliant anecdote and character sketch, Lewis is drawing us a map of markets and free enterprise in the twenty-first century.
Publisher Fact Sheet
In the weird glow of the dying millennium, Michael Lewis sets out on a safari through Silicon Valley to find the world's most important technology entrepreneur, the man who embodies the spirit of the coming age. He finds him in Jim Clark, who is about to create his third, separate, billion-dollar company: first Silicon Graphics, then Netscape-which launched the Information Age-& now Healtheon, a startup that may turn the $1 trillion healthcare industry on its head. Despite the variety of his achievements, Clark thinks of himself mainly as the creator of Hyperion, which happens to be a sailboat...not just an ordinary yacht, but the world's largest single-mast vessel, a machine more complex than a 747. Clark claims he will be able to sail it via computer from his desk in San Francisco, & the new code may contain the seeds of his next billion-dollar coup. On the wings of Lewis's celebrated storytelling, the reader takes the ride of a lifetime through this strange landscape of geeks & billionaires. We get the inside story of the battle between Netscape & Microsoft; we sit in the room as Clark tries to persuade the investment bankers that Healtheon is the next Microsoft; we get queasy as Clark pits his boat against the rage of the North Atlantic in winter. And in every brilliant anecdote & character sketch, Lewis is drawing us a map of markets & free enterprise in the twenty-first century. Michael Lewis, author of the blockbuster "Liar's Poker," takes us on a whirlwind tour through Silicon Valley's bizarre landscape of rich billionaires, & a world where wealth is created by perpetual change.
Unpaid Annotation
In the weird glow of the dying millennium, Michael Lewis sets out on a safari through Silicon Valley to find the world's most important technology entrepreneur. He finds him in Jim Clark, who is about to create his third, separate, billion-dollar company: first Silicon Graphics, then Netscape--and now Healtheon, a startup which he hopes will turn the $1 trillion healthcare industry on its head.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. 13
The Boat That Built Netscapep. 19
The Accelerated Grimacep. 28
The Past in a Boxp. 41
Disorganization Manp. 50
Inventing Jim Clarkp. 68
The Boom and the Mastp. 88
Throwing Sand in Capitalists' Eyesp. 101
The Great Brain Quake of August 9, 1995p. 112
The Home of the Future?p. 133
God Modep. 142
How Chickens Become Porkp. 151
New New Moneyp. 160
Cheese Sandwiches for Breakfastp. 176
Could Go Either Wayp. 189
At Sea in the Home of the Futurep. 206
Chasing Ghostsp. 223
The Turning Pointp. 238
The New New Thingp. 250
The Past outside the Boxp. 262
Epiloguep. 267
Acknowledgmentsp. 269
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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