Catalogue


Latin America between the Second World War and the Cold War, 1944-1948 /
edited by Leslie Bethell and Ian Roxborough.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
description
xi, 350 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521430321
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
isbn
0521430321
catalogue key
3249682
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-11:
The essays in this collection analyze factors militating against the emergence of social democracies in 11 Latin American nations immediately following WW II. Bethell and Roxborough, the volume's editors, are widely recognized for their many studies on 20th-century Brazil and Mexico respectively. They provide context for the 11 case studies by identifying the years between 1944 and 1948 as a critical time; the opportunity for democratization and social change, which peaked in 1946, generally was lost two years later because of domestic exigencies and the extension of the Cold War to Latin America. Supporting this thesis, the essayists demonstrate how the resurgence of the political right, state economic priorities, and compliance with US hemispheric security objectives reversed the democratizing tendencies that had been evident throughout Latin America during WW II and its aftermath. Their analyses, which are based largely on archival sources, emphasize the decline of effective labor militancy and the influence of the US in shaping domestic policies as key elements in this reversal. Advanced undergraduate; graduate; faculty. J. A. Gagliano; Loyola University of Chicago
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...the eleven essays in this volume are remarkably even in their high quality....a valuable addition to the relatively sparse historical literature on the early Cold War years in Latin America." Daniel Masterson, The Americas
"...what seemed an auspicious moment for social democratic forces soon gave way in most countries to authoritarian repression, restrictions on the left, military coups and conservative consolidation. This illuminating volume analyzes why this occurred, concentrating on the interplay between domestic economic and social factors and the influence of U.S. policy." Foreign Affairs
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1993
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Summaries
Main Description
This volume aims to establish that the period between World War II and the beginning of the Cold War (1944-5 to 1947-8) represents an important conjuncture in the political and social history of Latin America in the twentieth century. The volume contains an Introduction and a Conclusion by the editors and case studies of eleven of the twenty Latin American republics. Despite differences of political regime and different levels of economic and social development there are striking similarities in the experiences of the majority of the Latin American republics in this period. For most of Latin America it can be divided into two phases. The first, coinciding with the Allied victory in the Second World War, was characterized by three distinct but interrelated phenomena: democratization; a shift to the Left, both Communist and non-Communist; and unprecedented labor militancy. In the second phase, coinciding with the onset of the Cold War and completed almost everywhere by 1948, labor was disciplined by the State and in many cases excluded from politics; communist parties suffered proscription and severe repression; reformist, "progressive" parties moved to the right; the democratic advance was for the most part contained, and in some cases reversed.
Main Description
This volume aims to establish that the period between the end of the Second World War II and the beginning of the Cold War (1944-5 to 1947-8) hitherto neglected, represents an important conjuncture in the political and social history of twentieth-century Latin America. Despite differences in political regime, different levels of economic and social development, and different relations with the regional hegemony. There are striking similarities in the experiences of most of the Latin American republics at this time, which can be divided into two phases. The first, coinciding with the Allied victory, was characterized by democratization, a shift to the Left, and labor militancy. In the second phase, coinciding with the onset of the Cold War, labor was disciplined by the State and often excluded from politics, communist parties were severely repressed, reformist 'progressive' parties moved to the right, and the democratic advance was contained, when not reversed. The opportunity for social democracy was lost.
Description for Bookstore
The period between the end of the Second World War and the beginning of the Cold War 194445 to 194748) represents an important conjuncture in the political and social history of twentieth-century Latin America. The initial democratization and attempts at reform were eventually suppressed during the shift to the right at the beginning of the Cold War.
Description for Library
The period between the end of the Second World War and the beginning of the Cold War 1944-45 to 1947-48) represents an important conjuncture in the political and social history of twentieth-century Latin America. Despite differences in political regime, different levels of economic and social development, and different relations with the United States, there are striking similarities in the experiences of most of the Latin American republics at this time. The initial democratization and attempts at reform were eventually suppressed during the shift to the right at the beginning of the Cold War.
Description for Bookstore
The period between the end of the Second World War and the beginning of the Cold War 1944–45 to 1947–48) represents an important conjuncture in the political and social history of twentieth-century Latin America. The initial democratization and attempts at reform were eventually suppressed during the shift to the right at the beginning of the Cold War.
Table of Contents
Introduction: The Post-War Conjuncture in Latin America
Democracy, labor and the left Leslie Bethell
Country Studies
Brazil
Chile
Argentina
Bolivia
Venezuela
Peru
Mexico
Cuba
Nicaragua
Costa
Guatemala
Conclusion: the post-war conjuncture in Latin America and its consequences
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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