Catalogue


The peoples of Canada : a pre-Confederation history /
J.M. Bumsted.
imprint
Toronto : Oxford University Press Canada, 1992.
description
xiii, 442 p. : ill., maps, ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0195406907 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : Oxford University Press Canada, 1992.
isbn
0195406907 :
local note
ERIN holdings : v. 1., c. 1 ; v. 2, c. 1-3.
catalogue key
3248303
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Incorporates recent research on immigration and migration, settlement and land policy, town and country, rich and poor, and the best of social and economic geography, the whole illustrated with seven maps and an abundance of pictures chosen with uncommon care....Bumsted presents what facts and statistics there are and sets them firmly in a human framework by sketching biographies of typical individuals, an effective combination that few writers could improve upon."-- William and Mary Quarterly
"Incorporates recent research on immigration and migration, settlement and land policy, town and country, rich and poor, and the best of social and economic geography, the whole illustrated with seven maps and an abundance of pictures chosen with uncommon care....Bumsted presents what facts and statistics there are and sets them firmly in a human framework by sketching biographies of typical individuals, an effective combination that few writers could improve upon."--William and Mary Quarterly
This item was reviewed in:
Books in Canada, May 1993
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Bumsted has provided a fresh look at Canadian history, illuminating it forthe present time, in a text that is readable, richly detailed, and generouslyillustrated. Volume 1 describes the First Peoples before contact with theearliest European visitors, and then discusses exploration; settlement in theSt. Lawrence Valley and the Atlantic regions, the Conquest and its aftermath;the development of British North America in the Dominion of Canada; and theexpansion of Canada's domain and its economy.
Main Description
Bumsted has provided a fresh look at Canadian history, illuminating it for the present time, in a text that is readable, richly detailed, and generously illustrated. Volume 1 describes the First Peoples before contact with the earliest European visitors, and then discusses exploration;settlement in the St. Lawrence Valley and the Atlantic regions, the Conquest and its aftermath; the development of British North America in the Dominion of Canada; and the expansion of Canada's domain and its economy.
Long Description
This long-awaited history of Canada - the first survey by a single scholar in many years - is the result not only of Professor Bumsted's experience of teaching Canadian history and discussing it with his students over twenty-five years, but also of his assimilation of post-1970s historiography. He has written a highly readable and richly detailed new synthesis for the present time. Professor Bumsted explains in his Preface to Volume I that he has broken with the traditional model of Canadian historical surveys, which concentrated on such 'masculine' subjects as political constitutional, military issues, and the stages of nation-building (though these things are certainly not ignored), in favour of emphasizing the economy and particularly society, the family, and culture - the people themselves: he describes at some length many interesting people who were neither politicians nor administrators. A further departure from the traditional mode of writing Canadian history is that the country is not seen wholly in terms of its bilingual/bicultural development based in Ontario/Quebec. Not only other regions, but many cultural identities also have an important place in the text. Volume I describes the First Peoples before contact with the first European visitors, and discusses exploration; settlement in the St Lawrence valley and the Atlantic regions; the Conquest and its aftermath; the development of British North America and its societies; agricultural and commercial growth; the political changes that brought about the federation of four provinces of British North America in the Dominion of Canada; and the expansion of Canada's domain and its economic growth to 1885.
Table of Contents
Maps
Preface
The People of Early North Americap. 1
The Early Recordp. 2
The Eastern Maritime Peoplesp. 5
Northeastern Huntersp. 8
The Horticulturalistsp. 10
Western Peoplep. 11
The Pacific Slopep. 14
The Subarctic and the Arcticp. 16
The Problem of European Contactp. 19
The Explorers of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuriesp. 26
The Viking Explorersp. 26
The Background to the European Discovery of Americap. 28
John Cabot and the Portuguese Marinersp. 30
Jacques Cartierp. 32
Later English Activitiesp. 39
The Overland Explorersp. 43
Colonizers and Settlers in the Early Seventeenth Centuryp. 52
The Motives for Colonizationp. 52
The Colonization of Newfoundlandp. 56
Acadiap. 59
Canadap. 65
New France: War, Trade, and Adaptationp. 80
The Royal Takeover and the New Political Systemp. 82
The Role of the Militaryp. 85
The Demographic Problemp. 91
Economic Developmentp. 93
Societyp. 100
Culturep. 104
The Atlantic Region: The Cockpit of Empire, 1670-1758p. 107
Acadia and Ile-Royale, 1670-1748p. 109
Newfoundland, 1670-1760p. 118
The Founding of Halifax, 1749-1755p. 121
Acadia and the Expulsionsp. 125
The Fate of the Indian Populationp. 128
Nova Scotia in 1758p. 130
The Expansion and Contraction of Britain's North American Empire, 1759-1781p. 132
From the Plains of Abraham to the Proclamation of 1763p. 136
The Atlantic Region, 1763-1775p. 140
Quebec, 1763-1775p. 144
The First American Civil Warp. 147
The Ranges of Responsep. 152
Opening Up the Westp. 161
The End of the Warp. 163
The New Immigrants: Peopling British North America, 1783-1845p. 165
The Loyalistsp. 166
The Loyalist Impactp. 173
Post-Loyalist Immigrationp. 179
The Patterns of Post-1815 Immigrationp. 188
The Resource Economy and Its Society, 1783-1840p. 197
Fishp. 199
Furp. 202
Timberp. 206
Grainp. 208
The Mercantile Systemp. 210
The Resource Societyp. 219
Occupational Pluralitiesp. 225
The Disadvantagedp. 227
Mobilityp. 230
Politics and Culture, 1783-1840p. 231
Politicsp. 232
The War of 1812-14p. 236
Political Conflict: Early Oppositionp. 236
Political Conflict After 1820p. 242
Political Violence and Rebellionp. 248
Religionp. 257
Educationp. 260
Culturep. 263
Developing the Economy, 1840-1865p. 280
The Demise of Mercantilismp. 281
The Reaction to Free Trade in British North Americap. 284
Reciprocityp. 287
British North America Under Reciprocityp. 289
Industrializationp. 295
The Rise of Organized Labourp. 302
The West and Westward Expansionp. 305
Mineral Exploitationp. 310
Political Reform and Unification: 1840-1867p. 316
Reorienting Politics: The Achievement of Responsible Governmentp. 317
The Growth of New Political and Constitutional Problemsp. 319
A New Canadian Nationalityp. 326
The Road to Confederationp. 327
The Debates Over Unionp. 333
Confederation Becomes a Realityp. 337
Mid-Victorian Societyp. 338
Mobilityp. 340
A Stratifying Social Structurep. 349
The Marginalized Invisiblesp. 356
The Need to Belongp. 363
The Completion of Confederationp. 369
Completing the Unionp. 371
The Quest for National Policiesp. 279
Seeking National Identityp. 381
Educationp. 386
Other Cultural Activitiesp. 387
Confederation and the Less-Visible Minoritiesp. 391
Epiloguep. 400
Notesp. 402
Suggestions for Further Readingp. 418
General Bibliographyp. 428
Indexp. 429
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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