Catalogue


A short history of modern Arabic literature /
M.M. Badawi.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1993.
description
ix, 314 p.
ISBN
0198265425
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1993.
isbn
0198265425
catalogue key
3240332
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-11:
Badawi's book opens with an attack on John A. Haywood's Modern Arabic Literature, 1800-1970 (London, 1971), a more comprehensive book, and Pierre Cachia's An Overview of Modern Arabic Literature (Edinburgh, 1990), which is more scholarly. Here, modern Arabic literature is introduced orientalistically--e.g., Napoleon's invasion of Egypt is "the French campaign," the Ottoman General Muhammad Ali is the father of modern Arabic literature although he hardly knew Arabic: the infamous Egyptian occupation of Syria (1831-40) was of "crucial importance" in Syria's "cultural history"; the 1860 massacre of tens of thousands of Christians is "religious strife"; Nasser's coup d''etat is a "revolution" that "helped to push Arabic literature in other directions"; modern Arabic literature is a Western import, as though Arabic is exempt from cultural evolution. The book lists many names but few appropriate illustrations. Some of the Arabic literary terms are mistranslated. Adonis, the greatest living Arab poet, is one whose "controversial nature" made him "attempt to create metapoetry and metalanguage"! and so on, ad extremum. Recommended, but not to "the general intelligent English reader" or "the student" (preface). Faculty, professional. K. I. H. Semaan; SUNY at Binghamton
Reviews
Review Quotes
'A History of Modern Arabic Literature ... breaks new ground and fills a real need. It is organized in a very clear and systematic fashion.'Issa Peters, World Literature Today, Winter 1994 Issue
"A much-needed survey of Arabic literature....The book manages to provide a tremendous amount of information in a relatively small volume. It is no small task to put together such a survey, and Badawi manages to present background information, provide plot summaries, quote poetry, and give critical commentary in an easily manageable and readable form. A Short History of Modern Arabic Literature is an essential reference source that is a very welcome addition to studies on Arabic literature."--International Journal of Middle East Studies "This relatively compact edition would be ideal for a student home for the holidays."--The Washington Times
"A much-needed survey of Arabic literature....The book manages to provide a tremendous amount of information in a relatively small volume. It is no small task to put together such a survey, and Badawi manages to present background information, provide plot summaries, quote poetry, and give critical commentary in an easily manageable and readable form. A Short History of Modern Arabic Literature is an essential reference source that is a very welcome addition to studies on Arabic literature."-- International Journal of Middle East Studies "This relatively compact edition would be ideal for a student home for the holidays."-- The Washington Times
"A much-needed survey of Arabic literature....The book manages to provide a tremendous amount of information in a relatively small volume. It is no small task to put together such a survey, and Badawi manages to present background information, provide plot summaries, quote poetry, and give critical commentary in an easily manageable and readable form.A Short History of Modern Arabic Literatureis an essential reference source that is a very welcome addition to studies on Arabic literature."--International Journal of Middle East Studies "This relatively compact edition would be ideal for a student home for the holidays."--The Washington Times
Badawi's work is a good proof that modern Arabic literature has come into its own, and that it is now making a contribution to world literature.Times Higher Education Supplement
'this relatively compact edition would be ideal for a student home for the holidays'Brian Fannin, The Washington Times
Badawi's work is a good proof that modern Arabic literature has come into its own, and that it is now making a contribution to world literature.Times Higher Education Supplement'A History of Modern Arabic Literature ... breaks new ground and fills a real need. It is organized in a very clear and systematic fashion.'Issa Peters, World Literature Today, Winter 1994 Issue'this relatively compact edition would be ideal for a student home for the holidays'Brian Fannin, The Washington Times
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1993
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
This is a concise and authoritative survey of the whole of modern Arabic literature since the mid-19th century with a view to helping the general reader as well as the student to form a clear picture of the literary achievements of the modern Arabs. the drive for modernization, which started in Egypt and Syria early in the 19th century and which gradually spread to the rest of the Arab world, resulted in the introduction of secular education, printing, journalism, and much translation of western thought and literature. Consequently, a new reading public and a new conception of literature emerged. Inspired by rising nationalism and the conflict between Islam and westernization, writers sought to reflect and indeed change social and political reality, instead of merely displaying their verbal skill. This book examines the attempts made by Arab authors to define this cultural identity and meet the needs of the modern world by adapting the imported forms of the novel, short story, and drama, as well as their indigenous poetic and prose tradition.
Long Description
This is the first book in English that gives a concise and authoritative survey of the whole of modern Arabic literature since the mid-nineteenth century with a view to helping the general reader as well as the student to form a clear picture of the literary achievements of the modern Arabs. The drive for modernization, which started in Egypt and Syria early in the nineteenth century and which gradually spread to the rest of the Arab world, resulted in the introduction of secular education, printing, journalism, and much translation of western thought and literature. Consequently, a new reading public and a new conception of literature emerged. Inspired by rising nationalism and the conflict between Islam and westernization, writers sought to reflect and indeed change social and political reality, instead of merely displaying their verbal skill. This book examines the attempts made by Arab authors including Nobel winner Naguib Mahfouz to define this cultural identity and meet the needs of the modern world by adapting the imported forms of the novel, short story, and drama, as well as their indigenous poetic and prose tradition.
Main Description
Badawi gives a concise and authoritative survey, in English, of the whole whole of modern Arabic literature since the mid-19th century. He charts the efforts of Arab authors to meet the modern world in the imported forms of the novel, short story, and drama, aswell as in their indigenous poetic and prose tradition.
Main Description
This is a concise and authoritative survey of the whole of modern Arabic literature since the mid-19th century with a view to helping the general reader as well as the student to form a clear picture of the literary achievements of the modern Arabs. the drive for modernization, which startedin Egypt and Syria early in the 19th century and which gradually spread to the rest of the Arab world, resulted in the introduction of secular education, printing, journalism, and much translation of western thought and literature. Consequently, a new reading public and a new conception ofliterature emerged. Inspired by rising nationalism and the conflict between Islam and westernization, writers sought to reflect and indeed change social and political reality, instead of merely displaying their verbal skill. This book examines the attempts made by Arab authors to define thiscultural identity and meet the needs of the modern world by adapting the imported forms of the novel, short story, and drama, as well as their indigenous poetic and prose tradition.
Table of Contents
Note on Transliteration and Translationsp. xii
Introduction: A New Conception of Arabic Literaturep. 1
Poetry
Neo-Classical and Romanticp. 21
The Modernistsp. 53
The Novel and the Short Story
The Pioneersp. 91
Najib Mahfuz (Naguib Mahfouz) and Other Egyptiansp. 130
Other Arab Writers and Further Developments in the Short Storyp. 177
Drama
Early Developmentsp. 241
The Period of Maturityp. 255
Select bibliographyp. 289
Indexp. 303
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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