Catalogue


Education and independence : education in South Africa, 1658-1988 /
Simphiwe A. Hlatshwayo.
imprint
Westport, CT : Greenwood Press, 2000.
description
x, 132 p. : ill.
ISBN
0313300569 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, CT : Greenwood Press, 2000.
isbn
0313300569 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3223577
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [121]-130) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Simphiwe A. Hlatshwayo graduated from the University of Zululand in South Africa. He came to the United States in 1978 and graduated from the State University of New York (SUNY), Oneonta, with a Bachelor's Degree in Economics. He earned a Master of Arts Degree in International Affairs at Ohio University in 1983 and a Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction in 1991 from the same university. He had been Assistant Professor of Education and Political Science at Alma College, Michigan, and Assistant Professor of Education at Binghamton University. Most recently he was Professor of Education, Africana and Latino Studies at SUNY Oneonta.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œ...the effort is commendable, and the book can be a useful source for graduate students, academics, and researchers interested in South Africa or comparative studies.'' African Studies Review
"...the effort is commendable, and the book can be a useful source for graduate students, academics, and researchers interested in South Africa or comparative studies."- African Studies Review
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Public education can be one of the most powerful tools at the disposal of a government wanting to maintain power, as it is the realm in which children are taught the social values and norms that will sustain the culture when they become adults. In South Africa, education was kept separate, unequal, and decidedly undemocratic, and as Hlatshwayo explains, it was used specifically to preserve and perpetuate inequality. In a work designed for historians and education professionals alike, he examines the tumultuous and highly politicized history of South African education and evaluates the prospects for its hopefully nonracialized future. Hlatshwayo begins with a look at the socioeconomic and political structure (dating back as far as 1658) that allowed for South Africa's use of education as a tool of hegemony and follows this with a critical analysis of the educational system--its goals, objectives, organizational structure, and resistance thereto. Finally, drawing from the educational policy statements of the United Democratic Front (UDF) and the African National Congress (ANC), he proposes a democratic educational system for South Africa--something that, as he makes clear in this provocative and challenging work, has been an anathema for centuries to a government that had as its primary goal the subjugation of the majority of its citizens. Using an array of sociological and economic models, Hlatshwayo reveals the ways in which a society's educational system and its struggle toward freedom are inextricable.
Long Description
Public education can be one of the most powerful tools at the disposal of a government wanting to maintain power, as it is the realm in which children are taught the social values and norms that will sustain the culture when they become adults. In South Africa, education was kept separate, unequal, and decidedly undemocratic, and as Hlatshwayo explains, it was used specifically to preserve and perpetuate inequality. In a work designed for historians and education professionals alike, he examines the tumultuous and highly politicized history of South African education and evaluates the prospects for its hopefully nonracialized future. Hlatshwayo begins with a look at the socioeconomic and political structure (dating back as far as 1658) that allowed for South Africa's use of education as a tool of hegemony and follows this with a critical analysis of the educational systemits goals, objectives, organizational structure, and resistance thereto. Finally, drawing from the educational policy statements of the United Democratic Front (UDF) and the African National Congress (ANC), he proposes a democratic educational system for South Africasomething that, as he makes clear in this provocative and challenging work, has been an anathema for centuries to a government that had as its primary goal the subjugation of the majority of its citizens. Using an array of sociological and economic models, Hlatshwayo reveals the ways in which a society's educational system and its struggle toward freedom are inextricable.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. 1
Education and the Economyp. 13
Education in South Africa: 1658-1948p. 27
Bantu Educationp. 53
Schools and the Political Struggle: 1960-1988p. 69
Education and Democracyp. 103
Referencesp. 121
Indexp. 131
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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