Catalogue


The transformation of European politics 1763-1848 /
by Paul W. Schroeder.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1994.
description
xxii, 894 p. : maps.
ISBN
0198221193
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1994.
isbn
0198221193
catalogue key
322258
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [805]-878) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-12:
It has been 40 years since Oxford University Press published A.J.P. Taylor's study of European diplomatic history from 1848 to 1914. This new work by Schroeder, superb in its scholarly rigor and clarity of argument, is a companion piece to Taylor's The Struggle for Mastery in Europe (1954). But it is also very different, for where Taylor saw contingency in the realm of international politics, Schroeder sees a pattern. The Napoleonic Wars wrought a transformation in the European order; the older balance of power--anarchic, destructive, and unpredictable--was replaced by an equilibrium. However slowly the statesmen of the day learned their lesson, they learned it nonetheless; and when they made peace in Vienna in 1814-15, they abandoned the pursuit of self-interest in favor of restraint and cooperation. The treaty settlement with all its provisions mattered, but what mattered even more was the change in attitude that made it possible. The system that emerged, Schroeder contends, worked better than anything before or since. He may well be right. This is a book that, thanks to its powerful thesis (and to its lucidity and grace), will be read and discussed for decades. General and academic readers, undergraduate and above. S. Bailey; Knox College
Appeared in Library Journal on 1994-03-15:
Presupposing considerable background and frequently taking issue with conventional wisdom, this important historical interpretation of international relations focuses almost entirely on the aims and tactics of statesmen responsible for foreign policy. Schroeder (Univ. of Illinois) argues, in great detail and with formidable scholarship, that a third of a century of great power equilibrium was achieved only because the players learned the hard way that balance-of-power politics, with its constantly shifting alliances, led only to war, not security. Revolutionary change in international behavior, not the restoration of old ways, came with the Congress of Vienna. Acceptance of hegemony by states unequal in power, new developments in international law, and broader international consensus permitted peace and progress. Essential for academic libraries.-- R. James Tobin, Univ. of Wisconsin Lib., Milwaukee (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'a survey of European diplomacy over the previous eight-five years which has all the power and authority of taylor's work, together with his argumentativeness and sense of paradox...provocative and informed by an overarching theory...an indispensable work of reference, a sure-footed guidethrough the intricacies of great power politics, a much needed new account of the Congress of Vienna and Congress era in particular, and a monument of scholarship and stamina.'French History 9:2
'elegantly written ... What makes this volume so admirable and persuasive is that it is both based on the deepest imaginable reading, including study in archives, and also embodies the results of remorseless thinking about every twist and turn of international affairs, and much else, thoughoutthis complicated period. Schroeder takes no established opinion for granted. He probes incessantly the motives of all concerned. What he has to say about every one of the numerous crises and incidents he discusses is at once learned and profound, penetrating and decisive, always fresh and oftenbrilliantly original. It is certainly a provocative book ... exceptionally accurate, superbly planned and splendidly written ... It is a genuinely great book.'Derek Beales, Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, EHR Apr.96
"Highly readable and provocative....Schroeder delights in iconoclasm. That is part of the charm of this book; that is what makes it such fun to read....Stimulating and challenging."--Historian "[An] important historical interpretation of international relations....formidable scholarship....Essential for academic libraries."--Library Journal "This nuanced addition to Oxford's well-regarded History of Modern Europe series should stand a long test of time."--Booklist "...thorough, thoughtful, argumentative, clearly and elegantly written, and it will stand for a long time as one of a handful of works read with profit and interest by many of the reading public as well as by scholars and students."--Central European History, Vol.30, No.1, 1987
'It is the highest praise to say that this book is a worthy successor to Taylor's original volume. Sometimes, despite the forty-year gap, Schroeder's insights connect very directly with those of Taylor ... he has made as good a case as has been made in recent years for treating internationalhistory as an important discipline in its own right.'Times Literary Supplement
'Professor Schroeder has shown himself equal to the challenge, providing a survey of European diplomacy over the previous eighty-five years which has all the power and authority of Taylor's work, together with his argumentativeness and sense of paradox. If it is less outrageous and craftedwith more patience, worked like wrought iron, to use Schroeder's own analogy, it is nonetheless provocative and informed by an overarching theory.'R.N. Gildea, Merton College, Oxford
'rather a lengthy but highly readable and provicative examination of the development of international relations during that period. The book is strewn with rejected traditional interpretations and discarded scholarly truisms...Schroeder delights in iconoclasm. That is part of the charm of thisbook which makes it such fun to read...stimulating and challenging book.'The Historian
'Schroeder gives a new and positive interpretation to the concept of the 'concert' of Europe.'History Today
'Schroeder's magisterial work is already justly acclaimed as a classic ... the book is well structured, clearly written and organised by a number of central theses ... this volume will long stand deservedly as a classic and is unlikely to be matched at this length ... Schroeder both has atruly European range and spans the gulf between history and political science. He achieves both more fully than any other scholar. Those who are expert in the subject will recognise the brilliance and the scholarship of this volume.'Times Higher Educational Supplement
'Until now Paul Schroeder has been known as a good historian; henceforward he will be remembered as a great one. Dazzling in its concepts and masterly in its execution, The Transformation of European Politics is a sweeping review of the international history of Europe from the end of the SevenYears' War to the revolutions of 1848. Certain to be essential for all students and scholars working on this period, its extraordinary breadth of vision, entertaining language and penetrating insights must surely guarantee it recognition as a classic of twentieth-century historiography ... a work ofuntrammelled brilliance whose author deserves not only the utmost credit but also the thanks and admiration of the entire historical community; there can, in consequence, be no doubt that it will remain the standard work for many years to come.'Charles Esdaile, University of Liverpool, European Review of History-Revue europeenne d'histoire Vol. 3 No. 2
''It is the highest praise to say that this book is a worthy successor to Taylor''s original volume. Sometimes, despite the forty-year gap, Schroeder''s insights connect very directly with those of Taylor ... he has made as good a case as has been made in recent years for treating international history as an important discipline in its own right.''Times Literary Supplement'Schroeder''s magisterial work is already justly acclaimed as a classic ... the book is well structured, clearly written and organised by a number of central theses ... this volume will long stand deservedly as a classic and is unlikely to be matched at this length ... Schroeder both has a truly European range and spans the gulf between history and political science. He achieves both more fully than any other scholar. Those who are expert in the subjectwill recognise the brilliance and the scholarship of this volume.''Times Higher Educational Supplement'Schroeder gives a new and positive interpretation to the concept of the 'concert'' of Europe.''History Today'rather a lengthy but highly readable and provicative examination of the development of international relations during that period. The book is strewn with rejected traditional interpretations and discarded scholarly truisms...Schroeder delights in iconoclasm. That is part of the charm of this book which makes it such fun to read...stimulating and challenging book.''The Historian'a survey of European diplomacy over the previous eight-five years which has all the power and authority of taylor''s work, together with his argumentativeness and sense of paradox...provocative and informed by an overarching theory...an indispensable work of reference, a sure-footed guide through the intricacies of great power politics, a much needed new account of the Congress of Vienna and Congress era in particular, and a monument of scholarship andstamina.''French History 9:2'Professor Schroeder has shown himself equal to the challenge, providing a survey of European diplomacy over the previous eighty-five years which has all the power and authority of Taylor''s work, together with his argumentativeness and sense of paradox. If it is less outrageous and crafted with more patience, worked like wrought iron, to use Schroeder''s own analogy, it is nonetheless provocative and informed by an overarching theory.''R.N. Gildea, Merton College, Oxford'Until now Paul Schroeder has been known as a good historian; henceforward he will be remembered as a great one. Dazzling in its concepts and masterly in its execution, The Transformation of European Politics is a sweeping review of the international history of Europe from the end of the Seven Years'' War to the revolutions of 1848. Certain to be essential for all students and scholars working on this period, its extraordinary breadth of vision, entertaininglanguage and penetrating insights must surely guarantee it recognition as a classic of twentieth-century historiography ... a work of untrammelled brilliance whose author deserves not only the utmost credit but also the thanks and admiration of the entire historical community; there can, in consequence,be no doubt that it will remain the standard work for many years to come.''Charles Esdaile, University of Liverpool, European Review of History-Revue européenne d''histoire Vol. 3 No. 2'elegantly written ... What makes this volume so admirable and persuasive is that it is both based on the deepest imaginable reading, including study in archives, and also embodies the results of remorseless thinking about every twist and turn of international affairs, and much else, thoughout this complicated period. Schroeder takes no established opinion for granted. He probes incessantly the motives of all concerned. What he has to say about every one ofthe numerous crises and incidents he discusses is at once learned and profound, penetrating and decisive, always fresh and often brilliantly original. It is certainly a provocative book ... exceptionally accurate, superbly planned and splendidly written ... It is a genuinely great book.''Derek Beales, Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, EHR Apr.96
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, March 1994
Library Journal, March 1994
Choice, December 1994
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
This landmark study of European international politics is a worthy complement to A.J.P. Taylor's classic The Struggle for Mastery in Europe 1848-1918. Paul Schroeder's comprehensive and authoritative addition to the Oxford History of Modern Europe charts the course of international history over the turbulent era of 1763-1848 in which the map of Europe and much of the world was redrawn time and again. Schroeder examines the wars, political crises, and intricate diplomatic transactions of the age, many of which, especially the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, and the Congress of Vienna and its aftermath, had far-reaching consequences for modern Europe. Schroeder also provides a new sharply revisionist account of the course of international politics over these years and a major reinterpretation of the structure and operation of the international system. He shows how the practice of international politics was transformed in revolutionary ways with extensive and beneficial effects. The Vienna Settlement established peace, he demonstrates, by abandoning, not restoring, the competitive balance-of-power politics of the eighteenth century, and devising a new political equilibrium in its stead. A European consensus on a new political balance was developed, with new rules to maintain it, ushering in a uniquely peaceful, progressive period in European international politics. This wide-ranging and penetrating study will be of great interest to historians, political scientists, and students of international relations.
Main Description
A new account of the course of international politics during this significant period in the shaping of modern Europe, and a major reinterpretation of the structure and operation of the international system.
Main Description
This is the only modern study of European politics to cover the entire timespan from the end of the Seven Years' War in 1763 to the revolutionary year of 1848. Paul Schroeder's comprehensive and authoritative volume charts the course of international history over this turbulent period, inwhich the map of Europe was redrawn time and again. Professor Schroeder examines the wars, political crises, and diplomatic opportunities of the age, many of which - the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, the Congress of Vienna and its aftermath - had far-reaching consequences for modern Europe.Professor Schroeder provides a new account of the course of international politics over these years and a major reinterpretation of the structure and operation of the international system. He shows how the practice of international politics was transformed in revolutionary ways, with far-reachingand beneficial effects. The Vienna Settlement established peace by abandoning the competitive balance-of-power politics of the eighteenth century, and devising a new political equilibrium. It created a European consensus on a new political balance with new rules to maintain it, ushering in auniquely peaceful, progessive period in European international politics.
Table of Contents
The Destruction of Eighteenth-Century Politics
The European System, 1763-1787
War and Revolution, 1787-1792
The First Coalition, 1792-1797
The Second Coalition, 1798-1802
The Third Coalition, 1802-1805
From Pressburg to Tilsit, 1806-1807
Tilsit Undermined, 1807-1809
Napoleon's Empire and the International System
Napoleon's War with his Empire, 1810-1812
The Construction of the Nineteenth-Century System
Beginning and End, 1812-1813
War Ended, Peace Launched, 1813-1814
The Congress of Vienna, 1814-1815
The Congress Era, 1815-1823
Greece and the Russo-Turkish War, 1823-1829
Revolutions, Progress, and Standstill, 1830-1833
Deceptive Calm and Storms, 1833-1841
The Shadow of Revolution, 1841-1848
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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