Catalogue


An unwanted war : the diplomacy of the United States and Spain over Cuba, 1895-1898 /
by John L. Offner.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c1992.
description
xii, 306 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0807843806 (pbk. : alk. paper) 0807820385 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c1992.
isbn
0807843806 (pbk. : alk. paper) 0807820385 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3202877
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 279-295) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1992-09:
The Spanish-American War of 1898 has not received nearly as much detailed study as other American wars. Compared with such great conflicts as the Civil War and World War I, this small, swift war, with few casualties and an unambiguous conclusion, seemed rather simple. Typically, it has been portrayed as a symbolic struggle between a declining European power and the United States, whose foreign policy would dominate the 20th century. Offner (history, Shippensburg Univ.) does his readers a great service by probing beyond easy generalizations and demonstrating the intricate diplomatic efforts used to avoid military conflict. To his credit, he also explores the perspectives of the Spanish and the Cubans, having done prodigious research in international archives. The tangled relationships that Offner reveals between internal politics and foreign relations make the war seem not quite so simple and much more worthy of study. A fascinating and relevant work in the wake of the recent Persian Gulf War, another war that lasted only a few months.-- Charles K. Piehl, Mankato State Univ., Minn. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1993-02:
After 35 years and multi-archival research in ten countries, Offner concludes that the US reluctantly entered the war with Spain in 1898 primarily because the Republican party wanted to retain control of Congress. One wonders why it took so long to arrive at this limited causal conclusion. Offner is well aware of other factors: imperialism, foreign markets, national security, the yellow press. Yet all are judged "much less important in carrying the United States into war." The fact that the US was suffering through the worst economic depression in its history up to that time goes practically unnoticed. Offner ignores the need to protect the China market from an Asian base of operations, perhaps in the Philippines, after China's loss to Japan in the 1895 war. Although this book is recommended and does add to knowledge of intimate details of the process leading to war and eventual armistice, readers must consult other works for broader understanding. See David Healy's Drive to Hegemony (1988), Walter La Feber's The New Empire (CH, May'64), and Ernest May's Imperial Democracy (1961) for differing explanations as to why Cuban independence became important enough for the US to pursue war with Spain. Advanced undergraduate; graduate; faculty. S. Prisco III; Stevens Institute of Technology
Reviews
Review Quotes
One of the most complete and certainly one of the better-researched presentations of the traditional historiography. Journal of American History
A fascinating and relevant work in the wake of the recent Persian Gulf War. Library Journal ". . . . [Offner] emphasizes the domestic influences that affected the policies of the belligerents but also notes the larger international circumstances that conditioned judgments in Washington and in Madrid. This study demonstrates that the practice of international political history in the United States is alive and well."--David F. Trask, author of ###The War with Spain in 1898# "A major contribution to the historical literature on the war with Spain in 1898. John Offner's prodigious research in European and Cuban sources has enabled him to replace all previous treatments about the coming of the war and its impact on the history of the United States."--Lewis L. Gould, University of Texas at Austin
An Unwanted Warcombines rich detail, provocative insights, a wealth of fresh material, and a clear-cut point of view.The Americas
An Unwanted War combines rich detail, provocative insights, a wealth of fresh material, and a clear-cut point of view. The Americas
Exhaustively researched, clearly and logically written, and forcefully argued.International History Review
Exhaustively researched, clearly and logically written, and forcefully argued. International History Review
Far and away the best single account of the diplomacy associated with the short but extraordinarily important war with Spain.David F. Trask, author ofThe War with Spain in 1898
Far and away the best single account of the diplomacy associated with the short but extraordinarily important war with Spain. David F. Trask, author of The War with Spain in 1898
One of the most complete and certainly one of the better-researched presentations of the traditional historiography.Journal of American History
A fascinating and relevant work in the wake of the recent Persian Gulf War.Library Journal ". . . . [Offner] emphasizes the domestic influences that affected the policies of the belligerents but also notes the larger international circumstances that conditioned judgments in Washington and in Madrid. This study demonstrates that the practice of international political history in the United States is alive and well."--David F. Trask, author of ###The War with Spain in 1898# "A major contribution to the historical literature on the war with Spain in 1898. John Offner's prodigious research in European and Cuban sources has enabled him to replace all previous treatments about the coming of the war and its impact on the history of the United States."--Lewis L. Gould, University of Texas at Austin
This item was reviewed in:
Choice,
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Summaries
Long Description
Offner clarifies the complex relations of the United States, Spain, and Cuba leading up to the Spanish-American War and contends that the war was not wanted by any of the parties but was nonetheless unavoidable. He shows that a final round of peace negotiations failed in large part because internal political constraints limited diplomatic flexibility.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
the Cuban Revolution Three Perspectivesp. 1
Cuba, Cleveland, and Cánovasp. 17
Mckinley and Cánovasp. 37
the Woodford Missionp. 54
Sagasta's Cuban Reformsp. 68
Failure of Cuban Reformsp. 86
Two Shocks the De Lôme Letter and the Maine Disasterp. 111
Backdrop for Diplomacyp. 127
Failure to Solve the Crisisp. 143
Spanish Suspension of Hostilitiesp. 159
Descent into Warp. 177
Preliminaries to Peacep. 194
the Peace Protocolp. 209
Conclusionp. 225
Appendixp. 237
Notesp. 239
Bibliographyp. 279
Indexp. 297
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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