Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Process innovation : reengineering work through information technology /
Thomas H. Davenport.
imprint
Boston, Mass. : Harvard Business School Press, 1993.
description
x, 337 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0875843662 (acid-free paper) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Boston, Mass. : Harvard Business School Press, 1993.
isbn
0875843662 (acid-free paper) :
catalogue key
3202260
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-04:
Davenport tells us that process innovation "combines the adoption of a process view of the business with the application of innovation to key processes." The author bases his analyses on data collected from major firms in North America, Europe, Latin America, and Japan. He argues persuasively that the business decision to implement information technology is likely to prove unfortunate unless a careful study of organizational processes is first undertaken to understand how information technology enables process improvement and innovation. The goal of process innovation is to achieve major reductions in process cost or time, or major improvements in quality, flexibiity, service levels, or other business objectives. The latter part of the book covers innovative strategies for typical process types including product and service development and delivery processes, customer-facing processes, and management processes. The book includes an interesting appendix on the origins of process innovation and a detailed index. Intelligently presented and well-written, this volume is recommended for advanced undergraduates; graduate students; and business professionals. E. J. Szewczak; Canisius College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 1993
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The business environment of the 1990s demands significant changes in the way we do business. Simply formulating strategy is no longer sufficient; we must also design the processes to implement it effectively. The key to change is process innovation, a revolutionary new approach that fuses information technology and human resource management to improve business performance. The cornerstone to process innovation's dramatic results is information technology - a largely untapped resource, but acrucial "enabler" of process innovation. In turn, only a challenge like process innovation affords maximum use of information technology's potential. Davenport provides numerous examples of firms that have succeeded or failed in combining business change and technology initiatives. He also highlights the roles of new organizational structures and human resource programs in developing process innovation. Process innovation is quickly becoming the byword for industries ready to pull their companies out of modest growth patterns and compete effectively in the world marketplace.
Main Description
Today's business environment demands significant changes in the way we do business. Simply formulating strategy is no longer sufficient; we must also design the processes to implement it effectively. The key to change is process innovation, a revolutionary new approach that fuses information technology and human resource management to improve business performance. The cornerstone to process innovation's dramatic results is information technology--a largely untapped resource, but a crucial enabler of process innovation. In turn, only a challenge like process innovation affords maximum use of information technology's potential. Davenport provides numerous examples of firms that have succeeded or failed in combining business change and technology initiatives. He also highlights the roles of new organizational structures and human resource programs in developing process innovation. Process innovation is quickly becoming the byword for industries ready to pull their companies out of modest growth patterns and compete effectively in the world marketplace.
Unpaid Annotation
Process innovation - a revolutionary new approach that fuses information technology and human resource management - can dramatically improve business performance. In the demanding environment of the 1990s, simply formulating strategy is no longer sufficient; it is also essential to design the processes to implement strategy effectively. Built around new technologies and motivated workers, process innovation begins with a commitment to a strategic vision from senior management. Its scope is vast and crosses multiple business functions. Its goals are ambitious - companies embarking on process innovation often seek tenfold improvements in cost, time, or quality. For example, IBM reduced the preparation time for quotes on buying or leasing a computer from seven days to one, while preparing 10 times as many quotes. The Internal Revenue Service collected 33% more from delinquent taxpayers, with only half the staff and one-third the branch offices. One analysis of the New York Stock Exchange suggests that a redesign of trading processes could save buyers and sellers hundreds of millions of dollars each year. The cornerstone to process innovation's dramatic results is information technology - a largely untapped resource, but a crucial "enabler" of process innovation. In turn, only a challenge like process innovation affords maximum use of information technology's potential. Thomas Davenport provides numerous examples of firms that have succeeded or failed in combining business change and technology initiatives. He also highlights the role of new organizational structures and human resource programs in facilitating this process. Process innovation is quickly becoming the byword for managersready to lead their companies out of modest growth patterns and into highly effective competition in the global marketplace. This book should be read by general and functional managers, quality and information technology profess
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
The Nature of Process Innovationp. 1
A Framework for Process Innovation
Selecting Processes for Innovationp. 27
Information Technology as an Enabler of Process Innovationp. 37
Processes and Informationp. 71
Organizational and Human Resource Enablers of Process Changep. 95
Creating a Process Visionp. 117
Understanding and Improving Existing Processesp. 137
Designing and Implementing the New Process and Organizationp. 153
The Implementation of Innovative Business Processes
Process Innovation and the Management of Organizational Changep. 167
Implementing Process Innovation with Information Technologyp. 199
Innovation Strategies for Typical Process Types
Product and Service Development and Delivery Processesp. 221
Customer-Facing Processesp. 243
Management Processesp. 275
Summary and Conclusionsp. 299
Appendix A: Companies Involved in the Researchp. 309
Appendix B: The Origins of Process Innovationp. 311
Indexp. 327
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem