Catalogue

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Edith Wharton in context : essays on intertextuality /
Adeline R. Tintner.
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c1999.
description
xvii, 263 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0817309756 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c1999.
isbn
0817309756 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
3201472
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-04:
The most significant of Tintner's essays (written over 25 years) focus on the works and the lives of Edith Wharton and Henry James. Close textual analysis is the sole method by which Tintner discusses the works and lives of Wharton and James, since they borrowed from each other's works and their very lives provided models for creating characters. Biographers and students of their literary development will find these essays useful. But beyond this raw material for scholars, readers will find relatively few ideas in the collection. Isolated essays look at Wharton in conjunction with other writers: Paul Bourget, George Gissing, F. Marion Crawford, Grace Aguilar, Ernest Hemingway. Another group of essays looks into the role that art works played in Wharton's fiction, and the movements she was interested in as a social historian. Only libraries developing collections for graduate students and researchers will find this book of value. Q. Grigg; emeritus, Hamline University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Every library and every lover of Wharton will have to have this rich new resource. Adeline Tintner's work is always impeccably researched, vastly informative, and bears the stamp of Tintner's invariable scholarly integrity." - Krisin Lauer, Fordham University
"Every library and every lover of Wharton will have to have this rich new resource. Adeline Tintner's work is always impeccably researched, vastly informative, and bears the stamp of Tintner's invariable scholarly integrity." Krisin Lauer, Fordham University
“Every library and every lover of Wharton will have to have this rich new resource. Adeline Tintner’s work is always impeccably researched, vastly informative, and bears the stamp of Tintner’s invariable scholarly integrity.” – Krisin Lauer, Fordham University
"In an age of academic obfuscation, master scholar Adeline Tintner not only presents clear ideas but also augments them with welcome background." - Helen Killoran , Ohio University at Lancaster
"In an age of academic obfuscation, master scholar Adeline Tintner not only presents clear ideas but also augments them with welcome background." Helen Killoran , Ohio University at Lancaster
“In an age of academic obfuscation, master scholar Adeline Tintner not only presents clear ideas but also augments them with welcome background.” – Helen Killoran , Ohio University at Lancaster
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2000
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
These new and classic essays, researched and written over a 25-year period, are driven and enriched by the enthusiasm, curiosity, and passion of a scholar still making discoveries about a subject of lifelong fascination. Essays at the center of the collection explore Wharton's textual relationships with authors whom she knew well-especially Henry James but also Paul Bourget, F. Marion Crawford, and Vivienne de Watteville.
Back Cover Copy
These new and classic essays, researched and written over a 25-year period, are driven and enriched by the enthusiasm, curiosity, and passion of a scholar still making discoveries about a subject of lifelong fascination. Essays at the center of the collection explore Wharton’s textual relationships with authors whom she knew well-especially Henry James but also Paul Bourget, F. Marion Crawford, and Vivienne de Watteville.
Main Description
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}These new and classic essays, researched and written over a 25-year period, are driven and enriched by the enthusiasm, curiosity, and passion of a scholar still making discoveries about a subject of lifelong fascination.Essays at the center of the collection explore Whartonu2019s textual relationships with authors whom she knew well-especially Henry James but also Paul Bourget, F. Marion Crawford, and Vivienne de Watteville-and those she knew only through their writing, including Grace Aguilar, George Gissing, and Hugh Walpole. Tintner provides a detailed analysis of the complex interplay between Wharton and James,--how they influenced each other and how some of their writings operate as homages or personal jokes. So deeply was James in Whartonu2019s confidence, Tintner argues, that he provided her with source models for a number of her characters. In addition, Wharton found in his fiction structures for her own, especially for The Age of Innocence.Tintner also brings her considerable knowledge of art history to bear in her study of art allusions in Whartonu2019s work. Whartonu2019s response both to the Italian painters active before Raphael and to the English Pre-Raphaelites of a generation before her own is analyzed here in three essays. These pieces demonstrate Whartonu2019s sensibility to changes in art tastes and collecting, the inheritance of Rossettiu2019s revolutionary paintings in the unfinished novel, The Buccaneers, and the importance of home in The Glimpses of the Moon, as demonstrated by Whartonu2019s use of Tiepolou2019s fresco in the church of Scalzi.Tintner concludes by considering Whartonu2019s literary legacy and who Wharton has figured in the imaginations of recent writers, including Richard Howard, Louis Auchincloss, and Cathleen Schine. Tintner finds some part of Whartonu2019s personality or work evoked in a number of contemporary works and argues that this presence signals the beginning of an increasing influence.
Main Description
These new and classic essays, researched and written over a 25-year period, are driven and enriched by the enthusiasm, curiosity, and passion of a scholar still making discoveries about a subject of lifelong fascination. Essays at the center of the collection explore Wharton's textual relationships with authors whom she knew well--especially Henry James but also Paul Bourget, F. Marion Crawford, and Vivienne de Watteville--and those she knew only through their writing, including Grace Aguilar, George Gissing, and Hugh Walpole. Tintner provides a detailed analysis of the complex interplay between Wharton and James,--how they influenced each other and how some of their writings operate as homages or personal jokes. So deeply was James in Wharton's confidence, Tintner argues, that he provided her with source models for a number of her characters. In addition, Wharton found in his fiction structures for her own, especially for The Age of Innocence . Tintner also brings her considerable knowledge of art history to bear in her study of art allusions in Wharton's work. Wharton's response both to the Italian painters active before Raphael and to the English Pre-Raphaelites of a generation before her own is analyzed here in three essays. These pieces demonstrate Wharton's sensibility to changes in art tastes and collecting, the inheritance of Rossetti's revolutionary paintings in the unfinished novel, The Buccaneers , and the importance of home in The Glimpses of the Moon , as demonstrated by Wharton's use of Tiepolo's fresco in the church of Scalzi. Tintner concludes by considering Wharton's literary legacy and who Wharton has figured in the imaginations of recent writers, including Richard Howard, Louis Auchincloss, and Cathleen Schine. Tintner finds some part of Wharton's personality or work evoked in a number of contemporary works and argues that this presence signals the beginning of an increasing influence.
Main Description
These new and classic essays, researched and written over a 25-year period, are driven and enriched by the enthusiasm, curiosity, and passion of a scholar still making discoveries about a subject of lifelong fascination. Essays at the center of the collection explore Wharton's textual relationships with authors whom she knew well-especially Henry James but also Paul Bourget, F. Marion Crawford, and Vivienne de Watteville-and those she knew only through their writing, including Grace Aguilar, George Gissing, and Hugh Walpole. Tintner provides a detailed analysis of the complex interplay between Wharton and James,--how they influenced each other and how some of their writings operate as homages or personal jokes. So deeply was James in Wharton's confidence, Tintner argues, that he provided her with source models for a number of her characters. In addition, Wharton found in his fiction structures for her own, especially for The Age of Innocence . Tintner also brings her considerable knowledge of art history to bear in her study of art allusions in Wharton's work. Wharton's response both to the Italian painters active before Raphael and to the English Pre-Raphaelites of a generation before her own is analyzed here in three essays. These pieces demonstrate Wharton's sensibility to changes in art tastes and collecting, the inheritance of Rossetti's revolutionary paintings in the unfinished novel, The Buccaneers , and the importance of home in The Glimpses of the Moon , as demonstrated by Wharton's use of Tiepolo's fresco in the church of Scalzi. Tintner concludes by considering Wharton's literary legacy and who Wharton has figured in the imaginations of recent writers, including Richard Howard, Louis Auchincloss, and Cathleen Schine. Tintner finds some part of Wharton's personality or work evoked in a number of contemporary works and argues that this presence signals the beginning of an increasing influence.
Main Description
These new and classic essays, researched and written over a 25-year period, are driven and enriched by the enthusiasm, curiosity, and passion of a scholar still making discoveries about a subject of lifelong fascination. Essays at the center of the collection explore Wharton’s textual relationships with authors whom she knew well-especially Henry James but also Paul Bourget, F. Marion Crawford, and Vivienne de Watteville-and those she knew only through their writing, including Grace Aguilar, George Gissing, and Hugh Walpole. Tintner provides a detailed analysis of the complex interplay between Wharton and James,--how they influenced each other and how some of their writings operate as homages or personal jokes. So deeply was James in Wharton’s confidence, Tintner argues, that he provided her with source models for a number of her characters. In addition, Wharton found in his fiction structures for her own, especially for The Age of Innocence . Tintner also brings her considerable knowledge of art history to bear in her study of art allusions in Wharton’s work. Wharton’s response both to the Italian painters active before Raphael and to the English Pre-Raphaelites of a generation before her own is analyzed here in three essays. These pieces demonstrate Wharton’s sensibility to changes in art tastes and collecting, the inheritance of Rossetti’s revolutionary paintings in the unfinished novel, The Buccaneers , and the importance of home in The Glimpses of the Moon , as demonstrated by Wharton’s use of Tiepolo’s fresco in the church of Scalzi. Tintner concludes by considering Wharton’s literary legacy and who Wharton has figured in the imaginations of recent writers, including Richard Howard, Louis Auchincloss, and Cathleen Schine. Tintner finds some part of Wharton’s personality or work evoked in a number of contemporary works and argues that this presence signals the beginning of an increasing influence.
Unpaid Annotation
THIS UNIQUE COMBINATION of biography, art history, critical analysis, and literary detective work provides new insights into Wharton and her relationship to other writers and artists.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Wharton and James
The "Fictioning" of Henry James in Wharton's "The Hermit and the Wild Woman" and "Ogrin the Hermit"p. 9
The Give-and-Take between Edith Wharton and Henry James: "The Velvet Glove" and Edith Whartonp. 20
The Metamorphoses of Edith Wharton in Henry James's Finer Grain Storiesp. 33
Jamesian Structures in The Age of Innocence and Related Storiesp. 58
"Bad" Mothers and Daughters in the Fiction of Wharton and Jamesp. 75
Wharton and James: Some Additional Literary Give-and-Takep. 79
Henry James's "Julia Bride": A Source for Chapter 9 in Edith Wharton's The Custom of the Countryp. 85
Wharton and Others
Edith Wharton and Paul Bourget: Literary Exchangesp. 93
The Portrait of Edith in Bourget's "L'Indicatrice"p. 99
Madame de Treymes Corrects Bourget's Un Divorcep. 104
Two Novels of the "Relatively Poor": George Gissing's New Grub Street and The House of Mirthp. 111
Edith Wharton and F. Marion Crawfordp. 116
Edith Wharton and Grace Aguilar: Mothers, Daughters, and Incest in the Late Novels of Edith Whartonp. 124
Edith Wharton, Ernest Hemingway, and Vivienne de Watteville, Speak to the Earthp. 134
Hugh Walpole's All Souls' Night and Edith Wharton's "All Souls'"p. 139
Consuelo Vanderbilt, John Esquemeling, and The Buccaneersp. 143
Wharton's Uses of Art
False Dawn and the Irony of Taste Changes in Artp. 155
Correggio and Rossetti in The Buccaneers: Tradition and Revolution in the Patterns of Lovep. 162
Tiepolo's Ceiling in the Church of the Scalzi and The Glimpses of the Moon: The Importance of Homep. 170
Literary Lives of Wharton
A Poet's Version of Edith Wharton: Richard Howard's The Lesson of the Masterp. 185
Louis Auchincloss Deconstructs the Biography of Edith Wharton: From Invented Ediths to Her Real Self: Justice to Teddy Wharton in "The Arbiter"p. 192
The Punishment of Morton Fullerton in "The 'Fulfillment' of Grace Eliot"p. 199
Morton Fullerton's View of the Affair in "They That Have Power to Hurt"p. 210
The "Real" Mrs. Wharton in The Education of Oscar Fairfaxp. 218
Edith Wharton as Herself in Carol DeChellis Hill's Henry James's Midnight Songp. 222
Cathleen Schine's The Love Letterp. 225
The Legacy of Wharton's Fiction: Three Rewritings
Louis Auchincloss Reinvents Edith Wharton's "After Holbein"p. 229
Daniel Magida's The Rules of Seduction and The Age of Innocencep. 233
Lev Raphael's The Edith Wharton Murdersp. 238
A Book and Four Friends: Henry James, Walter Berry, Edith Wharton, and W. Morton Fullertonp. 241
Indexp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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