Catalogue


Socialist Europe and revolutionary Russia : perception and prejudice 1848-1923 /
Bruno Naarden.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
description
595 p.
ISBN
0521414733 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
isbn
0521414733 (hardback)
catalogue key
3197774
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-10:
Naarden (Univ. of Amsterdam), a specialist in Russian history, has attempted in this dense work to write an intellectual history of the ways some western socialists viewed Russia. Naarden analyzes how these socialists responded to certain critical events in Russia and to the writings of some of their Russian colleagues from the middle of the 19th century to the consolidation of Bolshevik rule in the early 1920s. The author gives a great deal of space to the efforts of certain important Russian figures on the Left to inform their western counterparts about what was happening in their unhappy country. His coverage is selective. For example, he devotes a great deal more attention to setting out the ideas of Martov, the Menshevik leader, than he does to those of his victorious rival, Lenin. Naarden's sympathy for Martov is clear and he believes that the latter's criticisms of what the Bolsheviks did has been borne out by events since 1985. An interesting and thoughtful study, this work belongs in all specialized collections on Russian history. Graduate; faculty. F. J. Breit; Whitman College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1993
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume analyses perceptions and images of Russia held by European socialists in the period between the revolutions of 1848 and firm establishment of the Soviet regime in the early 1920s.
Description for Bookstore
Socialist Europe and Revolutionary Russia: Perception and Prejudice 1848-1923 analyses perceptions and images of Russia held by European socialists in the period between the revolutions of 1848 and firm establishment of the Soviet regime in the early 1920s.
Description for Library
Socialist Europe and Revolutionary Russia: Perception and Prejudice 1848-1923 analyses perceptions and images of Russia held by European socialists in the period between the revolutions of 1848 and firm establishment of the Soviet regime in the early 1920s. Professor Naarden investigates in detail the sometimes pernicious influence of the age-old Western image of Russia on the ideological outlook and actions of the largest organised political movement in Europe.
Main Description
Socialist Europe and Revolutionary Russia: Perception and Prejudice 1848–1923 analyses perceptions and images of Russia held by European socialists in the period between the revolutions of 1848 and firm establishment of the Soviet regime in the early 1920s. Professor Naarden investigates in detail the sometimes pernicious influence of the age-old Western image of Russia on the ideological outlook and actions of the largest organised political movement in Europe. Whereas the history of socialism has been largely written from a national point of view, or within a national framework, this survey of a major pan-European theme permits an alternative perspective on contemporary East-West relations, and on numerous important aspects of nineteenth-century socialism, not least the powerful role in its development of a number of Russian writers, whether as protagonists or opponents.
Main Description
Socialist Europe and Revolutionary Russia: Perception and Prejudice 1848'1923 analyses perceptions and images of Russia held by European socialists in the period between the revolutions of 1848 and firm establishment of the Soviet regime in the early 1920s. Professor Naarden investigates in detail the sometimes pernicious influence of the age-old Western image of Russia on the ideological outlook and actions of the largest organised political movement in Europe. Whereas the history of socialism has been largely written from a national point of view, or within a national framework, this survey of a major pan-European theme permits an alternative perspective on contemporary East-West relations, and on numerous important aspects of nineteenth-century socialism, not least the powerful role in its development of a number of Russian writers, whether as protagonists or opponents.
Main Description
Socialist Europe and Revolutionary Russia: Perception and Prejudice 1848-1923 analyses perceptions and images of Russia held by European socialists in the period between the revolutions of 1848 and firm establishment of the Soviet regime in the early 1920s. Professor Naarden investigates in detail the sometimes pernicious influence of the age-old Western image of Russia on the ideological outlook and actions of the largest organised political movement in Europe. Whereas the history of socialism has been largely written from a national point of view, or within a national framework, this survey of a major pan-European theme permits an alternative perspective on contemporary East-West relations, and on numerous important aspects of nineteenth-century socialism, not least the powerful role in its development of a number of Russian writers, whether as protagonists or opponents.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Western European image of Russia
Russian and European socialists
Russian and Western social democracy 1890-1905
1905: a failed revolution in Russia
Intermezzo 1906-1918
Socialist Europe and the October revolution 1918-1919
Social democracy in Soviet Russia and the continuation of the debate about communism in 1919-1920
1920-1921: division in the West, uprising and famine in Russia
1921-1923: the eclipse of the socialist centre in the West and the decline of democratic socialism in Soviet Russia
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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