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The politics of social conflict : the Peak Country, 1520-1770 /
Andy Wood.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1999.
description
xvi, 354 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521561140 (hb)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1999.
isbn
0521561140 (hb)
catalogue key
3197618
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-04:
Challenging postmodernist removal of the material foundations of class, modifying E. P. Thompson's chronology of class relations, Wood (Univ. of East Anglia) examines the role played by the customary right of "free mining" in shaping political consciousness among lead miners working the Peak Country in Derbyshire. Hierarchy and deference were public fictions barely disguising conflict between miners and lords that troubled the sixth earl of Shrewsbury and the eighth earl of Rutland so much that a descendant of the latter refused Wood access to his papers at Belvoir Castle. This study includes an abundance of maps, charts, and careful research, but it might have been more concise and better organized. Displaying theoretical and empirical sophistication, it includes, among other nuanced uses of manuscript sources, gendered readings of Duchy of Lancaster records. It provides a satisfying account of the customarily contentious ethos of miners in British history. Complements Buchanan Sharp's In Contempt of Authority (CH, Nov'80). Graduate students and faculty. M. C. Noonkester; William Carey College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a major scholarly achievement...inspiring..." Sixteenth Century Journal
"...a richly documented and important book...a very fine example of the too rarely attempted inegration of social and political history and successfully combines a fully realized regional study with a major contribution to our general understanding of early modern England." American Historical Review
'[a] richly rewarding study ... [Wood's] fine analysis of the plebeian politics of the Peak in the English Revolution ... is itself worth the price of admission to a masterclass in the new social history of politics.' Economic History Review
‘[A] richly rewarding study … [Wood’s] fine analysis of the plebeian politics of the Peak in the English Revolution … is itself worth the price of admission to a masterclass in the new social history of politics.’Economic History Review
"rich and nuanced study." Journl Of Modern History
"...this book stimulates and engages...all students of history." Robert L. Woods, History
"thoroughly researched... a welcome addition to the social history of early modern England." Journal of Interdisciplinary History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2000
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study examines the history of social conflict hased on a close study of the Peak Country of Derbyshire c. 1520-1770. It has implications for understandings of class identity, popular culture, riot, custom and social relations.
Description for Bookstore
This book provides an alternative approach to the history of social conflict, popular politics and plebeian culture and has implications for understandings of class identity, popular culture, riot, custom and social relations. Above all, the book challenges the claim that early modern England was a hierarchical, ‘pre-class’ society.
Description for Bookstore
This book provides an alternative approach to the history of social conflict, popular politics and plebeian culture and has implications for understandings of class identity, popular culture, riot, custom and social relations. Above all, the book challenges the claim that early modern England was a hierarchical, 'pre-class' society.
Main Description
This book provides an alternative approach to the history of social conflict, popular politics and plebeian culture in the early modern period. Based on a close study of the Peak Country of Derbyshire c. 1520–1770, it has implications for understandings of class identity, popular culture, riot, custom and social relations. A detailed reconstruction of economic and social change within the region is followed by an in-depth examination of the changing cultural meanings of custom, gender, locality, skill, literacy, orality and magic. The local history of social conflict sheds light upon the nature of political engagement and the origins of early capitalism. Important insights are offered into early modern social and gender identities, civil war allegiances, the appeal of radical ideas and the making of the English working class. Above all, the book challenges the claim that early modern England was a hierarchical, ‘pre-class’ society.
Main Description
This book provides an alternative approach to the history of social conflict, popular politics and plebeian culture in the early modern period. Based on a close study of the Peak Country of Derbyshire c. 1520-1770, it has implications for understandings of class identity, popular culture, riot, custom and social relations. A detailed reconstruction of economic and social change within the region is followed by an in-depth examination of the changing cultural meanings of custom, gender, locality, skill, literacy, orality and magic. The local history of social conflict sheds light upon the nature of political engagement and the origins of early capitalism. Important insights are offered into early modern social and gender identities, civil war allegiances, the appeal of radical ideas and the making of the English working class. Above all, the book challenges the claim that early modern England was a hierarchical, 'pre-class' society.
Main Description
This book provides a new approach to the history of social conflict, popular politics and plebeian culture. Based on a close study of the Peak Country of Derbyshire c. 1520-1770, it has implications for understandings of class identity, popular culture, riot, custom and social relations. Important insights are offered into early modern social and gender identities, civil war allegiances, the appeal of radical ideas and the making of the English working class. Above all, the book challenges the claim that early modern England was a hierarchical, "pre-class" society.
Table of Contents
List of figures
List of tables
List of maps
Preface
List of abbreviations
Introduction - 'terms we did not understand': landscape, place and perceptions
Social relations and popular culture in early modern England
The Structures of Inequality
Economy and society in the Peak Country, c. 1520âÇô1570
Industrialization and social change, c. 1570âÇô1660
The Peak Country as an industrial region, c. 1660âÇô1770
Social conflict and early capitalism
The Conditions of Community
'The memory of the people': custom, law and popular culture
The politics of custom
Community, identity and culture
The Politics of Social Conflict
'Pyllage uppon the poore mynorz': sources of social conflict, 1500âÇô1600
'All is hurly burly here': local histories of social conflict, 1600âÇô1640
The Peak in context: riot and popular politics in early Stuart England
'Prerogative hath many proctors': the English Revolution and the plebeian politics of the Peak, 1640âÇô1660
The experience of defeat? The defence of custom, 1660âÇô1770
The making of the English working class in the Derbyshire Peak Country
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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