Catalogue


The autobiography of Ōsugi Sakae /
translated with annotations by Byron K. Marshall.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1992.
description
xx, 167 p.
ISBN
0520077601 (pbk.) 0520077598
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
personal subject
More Details
uniform title
series title
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1992.
isbn
0520077601 (pbk.) 0520077598
general note
Translation of: Jijoden.
catalogue key
3194487
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Not only an important literary work but one of the major documents dealing with the development of the left-wing movement in modern Japanese politics."--Fred G. Notehelfer, author ofKotoku Shusui: Portrait of a Japanese Radical
Flap Copy
"Not only an important literary work but one of the major documents dealing with the development of the left-wing movement in modern Japanese politics."--Fred G. Notehelfer, author of Kotoku Shusui: Portrait of a Japanese Radical
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-09:
=Osugi Sakae (1885-1923) was a 19-year-old political activist in 1906 and an ardent supporter of left-wing radicalism in Japan during the rest of his short lifetime. =Osugi provides a personal memoir of childhood, family life, and education in the stultifying environment of late Mieji Japan, in which personal freedom was scarce, acceptance of and obedience to authority was standard, and experiments with individualism threatened to brand the experimenter as a social misfit and rebel. In the final three chapters of this autobiography, =Osugi describes his initial and then continuing interest and involvement in left-wing labor and political movements, his work with the leftist press, and his stints in prison up to about 1910. He was murdered by military police in 1923, the same year as the great Tokyo earthquake. Marshall's highly readable translation of =Osugi's autobiography is a welcome and valuable addition to the growing body of works in English that go beyond general historical formats and flesh out specific periods and topics. General; undergraduate; graduate; faculty. J. C. Cooley Jr.; University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Appeared in Library Journal on 1992-09:
This first English translation of Osugi's autobiography limns a portrait of late Meiji Japan that is rarely seen. Osugi, a flamboyant and notorious left-wing activist, began his radical career as a 19-year-old student in 1904. Murdered by the Japanese military police in 1923, Osugi left his writings, which bolstered his image as a romantic rebel hero. His autobiography covers only his younger years, but it includes a fine description of Japanese radicalism in its early stages of development. Osugi also provides readers with a close look at the brutal, dehumanizing practices prevalent in Japanese schools while he engagingly chronicles the making of a radical, especially in a valuable chapter on prison life in his time. Since little information about the early Japanese left-wing movement exists in English, this volume offers Westerners a unique chance to peer into the mind of a Japanese radical. Highly recommended for academic and public libraries.-- Katharine L. Kan, Aiea P.L., Hawaii (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
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Choice,
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Summaries
Main Description
In the Japanese labor movement of the early twentieth century, no one captured the public imagination as vividly as Osugi Sakae (1885-1923): rebel, anarchist, and martyr. Flamboyant in life, dramatic in death, Osugi came to be seen as a romantic hero fighting the oppressiveness of family and society. Osugi helped to create this public persona when he published his autobiography ( Jijoden ) in 1921-22. Now available in English for the first time, this work offers a rare glimpse into a Japanese boy's life at the time of the Sino-Japanese (1894-95) and the Russo-Japanese (1904-5) wars. It reveals the innocent--and not-so-innocent--escapades of children in a provincial garrison town and the brutalizing effects of discipline in military preparatory schools. Subsequent chapters follow Osugi to Tokyo, where he discovers the excitement of radical thought and politics. Byron Marshall rounds out this picture of the early Osugi with a translation of his Prison Memoirs (Gokuchuki) , originally published in 1919. This essay, one of the world's great pieces of prison writing, describes in precise detail the daily lives of Japanese prisoners, especially those incarcerated for political crimes.
Long Description
In the Japanese labor movement of the early twentieth century, no one captured the public imagination as vividly as Osugi Sakae (1885-1923): rebel, anarchist, and martyr. Flamboyant in life, dramatic in death, Osugi came to be seen as a romantic hero fighting the oppressiveness of family and society. Osugi helped to create this public persona when he published his autobiography (Jijoden) in 1921-22. Now available in English for the first time, this work offers a rare glimpse into a Japanese boy's life at the time of the Sino-Japanese (1894-95) and the Russo-Japanese (1904-5) wars. It reveals the innocent--and not-so-innocent--escapades of children in a provincial garrison town and the brutalizing effects of discipline in military preparatory schools. Subsequent chapters follow Osugi to Tokyo, where he discovers the excitement of radical thought and politics. Byron Marshall rounds out this picture of the early Osugi with a translation of hisPrison Memoirs (Gokuchuki), originally published in 1919. This essay, one of the world's great pieces of prison writing, describes in precise detail the daily lives of Japanese prisoners, especially those incarcerated for political crimes.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Translator's Introductionp. xi
Chronology of Major Events in The Autobiographyp. xix
First Memories: To 1894p. 3
Childhood: 1894-1895p. 25
A Young Hooligan: 1895-1899p. 41
Cadet School: 1899-1901p. 60
A New Life: 1901-1902p. 84
Memories of Mother: 1902-1904p. 101
Life in Prison: 1906-1910p. 127
Bibliographyp. 165
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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