Catalogue

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Ben-Gurion and the Palestinian Arabs : from peace to war /
Shabtai Teveth.
imprint
Oxford [Oxfordshire] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1985.
description
x, 234 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0195035623
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford [Oxfordshire] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1985.
isbn
0195035623
general note
Includes index.
Translation of: Ben-Guryon ṿe-ʻArviye Erets-Yiśraʼel.
catalogue key
3164017
 
Bibliography: p. 203-217.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1985-10:
What did David Ben-Gurion, Israel's founding father, really think about the Palestinian Arabs? Now, from one of Israel's leading journalist-historians, who has drawn on Ben-Gurion's diaries, letters, and records of closed meetings, comes an answer that is at once historical discovery and dynamite. Teveth's profoundly valuable book demolishes at a stroke conventional character studies of Ben-Gurion and a 20-year record of apparent efforts to first reconcile Jews and Arabs through socialism and then find formulas for political compromise. In actuality, shows Teveth, Ben-Gurion knew from 1915 onward that a conflict between two national movements, Jewish and Arab, was an unalterable fact and that war was expected and inevitable. As a calculated tactic, however, he avoided publicly conceding the existence of this conflict from 1917, and maneuvered to buy time, shift the onus of ``no compromise'' to the Arabs, and appeal to public opinion abroad. Privately, Ben-Gurion acknowledged the reality of Arab's grievances and even the legitimacy of a specifically Palestinian Arab nationalism, while publicly he developed analysis and arguments that continue to color perceptions of the conflict even to the present. As a portrait of David Ben-Gurion as the supreme pragmatist, and as a work of unflinching scholarship, this book will take its place among the significant literature on the Arab-Israeli conflict. General and academic readership, upper-division undergraduate level and above.-H.J. Dooley, Western Michigan University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1985
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Summaries
Long Description
Translated and condensed from an acclaimed Hebrew study, this is a major revisionist work by one of Israel's leading journalists and author of a multivolume biography of David Ben-Gurion. In the 42 years between 1921 and 1963--during which he served as labor leader, Zionist statesman, and Prime Minister of an independent Israel--Ben-Gurion's influence grew to have a decisive effect upon Jewish policy. Israel came to view the Arabs, to a great extent, through the eyes of David Ben-Gurion. From the outset, he was one of the few leaders of Labor Zionism who sought to anchor the Jewish right to Palestine in something other than historical argument and nationalist myth, Shabtai Teveth writes. But his views have been misinterpreted, derived almost exclusively from his public pronouncements. Teveth delves below the surface of Ben-Gurion's public and diplomatic stance, examining his diaries and letters and the minutes of closed meetings. On the basis of this new edvidence, Teveth gives us a fresh understanding of the man who has long been regarded as harsh and uncompromising, showing that Ben-Gurion was in fact the ultimate pragmatist, playing the roles of peacemaker and militant alternately and at times even simultaneously. About the Author: Shabtai Teveth is a Research Fellow at the Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies and at the Weizmann Zionist Research Center at Tel-Aviv University. He is also the author of The Tanks of Tammuz, The Cursed Blessing, and Moshe Dayan: A Biography.
Main Description
Translated and condensed from an acclaimed Hebrew study, this is a majorrevisionist work by one of Israel's leading journalists and author of amultivolume biography of David Ben-Gurion.In the 42 years between 1921 and 1963--during which he served as laborleader, Zionist statesman, and Prime Minister of an independentIsrael--Ben-Gurion's influence grew to have a decisive effect upon Jewishpolicy. Israel came to view the Arabs, to a great extent, through the eyes ofDavid Ben-Gurion. From the outset, he was one of the few leaders of LaborZionism who sought to anchor the Jewish right to Palestine in something otherthan historical argument and nationalist myth, Shabtai Teveth writes. But hisviews have been misinterpreted, derived almost exclusively from his publicpronouncements. Teveth delves below the surface of Ben-Gurion's public anddiplomatic stance, examining his diaries and letters and the minutes of closedmeetings. On the basis of this new edvidence, Teveth gives us a freshunderstanding of the man who has long been regarded as harsh and uncompromising,showing that Ben-Gurion was in fact the ultimate pragmatist, playing the rolesof peacemaker and militant alternately and at times even simultaneously.About the Author:Shabtai Teveth is a Research Fellow at the Dayan Center for Middle Eastern andAfrican Studies and at the Weizmann Zionist Research Center at Tel-AvivUniversity. He is also the author of The Tanks of Tammuz, The Cursed Blessing,and Moshe Dayan: A Biography.
Main Description
Translated and condensed from an acclaimed Hebrew study, this is a major revisionist work by one of Israel's leading journalists and author of a multivolume biography of David Ben-Gurion. In the 42 years between 1921 and 1963--during which he served as labor leader, Zionist statesman, and Prime Minister of an independent Israel--Ben-Gurion's influence grew to have a decisive effect upon Jewish policy. Israel came to view the Arabs, to a great extent, through the eyes of David Ben-Gurion. From the outset, he was one of the few leaders of Labor Zionism who sought to anchor the Jewish right to Palestine in something other than historical argument and nationalist myth, Shabtai Teveth writes. But his views have been misinterpreted, derived almost exclusively from his public pronouncements. Teveth delves below the surface of Ben-Gurion's public and diplomatic stance, examining his diaries and letters and the minutes of closed meetings. On the basis of this new edvidence, Teveth gives us a fresh understanding of the man who has long been regarded as harsh and uncompromising, showing that Ben-Gurion was in fact the ultimate pragmatist, playing the roles of peacemaker and militant alternately and at times even simultaneously. About the Author : Shabtai Teveth is a Research Fellow at the Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies and at the Weizmann Zionist Research Center at Tel-Aviv University. He is also the author of The Tanks of Tammuz, The Cursed Blessing, and Moshe Dayan: A Biography.
Main Description
Translated and condensed from an acclaimed Hebrew study, this is a major revisionist work by one of Israel's leading journalists and author of a multivolume biography of David Ben-Gurion. In the 42 years between 1921 and 1963--during which he served as labor leader, Zionist statesman, and Prime Minister of an independent Israel--Ben-Gurion's influence grew to have a decisive effect upon Jewish policy. Israel came to view the Arabs, to a great extent, through the eyes of David Ben-Gurion. From the outset, he was one of the few leaders of Labor Zionism who sought to anchor the Jewish right to Palestine in something other than historical argument and nationalist myth, Shabtai Teveth writes. But his views have been misinterpreted, derived almost exclusively from his public pronouncements. Teveth delves below the surface of Ben-Gurion's public and diplomatic stance, examining his diaries and letters and the minutes of closed meetings. On the basis of this new edvidence, Teveth gives us a fresh understanding of the man who has long been regarded as harsh and uncompromising, showing that Ben-Gurion was in fact the ultimate pragmatist, playing the roles of peacemaker and militant alternately and at times even simultaneously. About the Author: Shabtai Teveth is a Research Fellow at the Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies and at the Weizmann Zionist Research Center at Tel-Aviv University. He is also the author ofThe Tanks of Tammuz, The Cursed Blessing,andMoshe Dayan: A Biography.

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