Catalogue


The Southern marches of imperial Ethiopia : essays in history and social anthropology /
edited by Donald Donham and Wendy James.
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University press, 1986.
description
xvi, 308 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. --
ISBN
0521322375
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University press, 1986.
isbn
0521322375
general note
Includes index.
Revised versions of selected papers originally presented at a workshop of the Cambridge African Studies Centre in July 1979 and at a conference at Monterey, Calif. in March 1982.
catalogue key
3151378
 
Bibliography: p. 295-298.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Donald L. Donham is Professor of Anthropology and Director of African Studies at Emory University Wendy James is Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Oxford
Summaries
Main Description
This international collection of essays offers a new approach to the understanding of imperial Ethiopia, out of which the present state was created by the 1974 revolution. After the 1880s, Abyssinia, under Menilek II, expanded its ancient heartland to incorporate vast new territories to the south. Here, for the first time, these regions are treated as an integral part of the empire. The book opens with an interpretation of nineteenth-century Abyssinia as an African political economy, rather than as a variant on European feudalism, and with an account of the north's impact on peoples of the new south. Case studies from the southern regions follow four by historians and four by anthropologists, each examining aspects of the relationship between imperial rule and local society. In revealing the region's diversity and the relationship of the periphery to the centre, the volume illuminates some of the problems faced by postrevolutionary Ethiopia.
Main Description
This international collection of essays offers a unique approach to the understanding of imperial Ethiopia, out of which the present state was created by the 1974 revolution. After the 1880s, Abyssinia, under Menilek II, expanded its ancient heartland to incorporate vast new territories to the south. Here, for the first time, these regions are treated as an integral part of the empire. The book opens with an interpretation of nineteenth-century Abyssinia as an African political economy, rather than as a variant on European feudalism, and with an account of the north's impact on peoples of the new south. Case studies from the southern regions follow four by historians and four by anthropologists, each examining aspects of the relationship between imperial rule and local society. In revealing the region's diversity and the relationship of the periphery to the centre, the volume illuminates some of the problems faced by post-revolutionary Ethiopia.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. ix
The contributorsp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
The making of an imperial state
Old Abyssinia and the new Ethiopian empire: themes in social historyp. 3
Renegotiating power and authority
Nekemte and Addis Abeba: dilemmas of provincial rulep. 51
From ritual kings to Ethiopian landlords in Maalep. 69
Institutionalizing a fringe periphery: Dassanetch-Amhara relationsp. 96
Reorienting kinship and identity
Lifelines: exchange marriage among the Gumuzp. 119
A problem of domination at the periphery: the Kwegu and the Mursip. 148
Expanding tribute and trade
Coffee in centre-periphery relations: Gedeo in the early twentieth centuryp. 175
Vicious cycles: ivory, slaves, and arms on the new Maji frontierp. 196
On the Nilotic frontier: imperial Ethiopia in the southern Sudan, 1898-1936p. 219
Epiloguep. 246
Notesp. 250
Select bibliographyp. 294
Indexp. 299
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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