Catalogue


Critical angles : European views of contemporary American literature /
edited by Marc Chénetier.
imprint
Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, c1986.
description
xxv, 251 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0809312166
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, c1986.
isbn
0809312166
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
3145792
 
Bibliography: p. 223-242.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1986-07:
Currently, there is at least as much serious academic interest in the post-WW II American novel in Europe as there is in the U.S. Including an introduction and 13 good essays, this highly varied collection demonstrates that European scholars differ from American critics concerned with the same period in two ways: they unselfconsciously deploy a different, and in general more sophisticated, critical vocabulary, and they concentrate less on the authors and topics favored by their American counterparts. For example, John Hawkes is mentioned more often, and Saul Bellow less often, than they would be in a similar American collection. On the well-worked issues of modernism and postmodernism, the German scholar Hartwig Isernhagen's reflections manage to present a somewhat different perspective. Maurice Couturier and Heide Ziegler contribute brief and interesting essays on author-reader relations in narrative. Claude Richard's topical reading of Walker Percy's The Moviegoer is excellent. The contributions of Regis Durand on Donald Barthelme and Marc Chenetier on Raymond Carver will rank among the very best essays on these writers. There are also several pieces on poetry and drama. The volume will be a valuable addition to all collections of criticism on contemporary American literature and will prove useful to undergraduates as well as to graduate students.-K. Tololyan, Wesleyan University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1986
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Summaries
Main Description
The cultural rate of exchange cheats both sides of the Atlantic, leaving first-rate Eu­ropean writers unknown in America, ex­cellent American authors unread outside their native shores. Through these 13 essays by European critics, Chenetier seeks to remedy this, to encourage the cultural exchange between American and European writers. The au­thors discussed are living innovators, the critics contemporary and diverse. The es­sayists were asked to write as idiosyncratic a piece as they could think of, to do it with no holds barred, to indulge their particular critical manias or preferences, and to do so on the subject of their choice." The book is divided into two parts, Part 1 providing a general European view of American literature today. The essays in Part 2 focus on individual au­thors--Walker Percy, William Gaddis and Gilbert Sorrentino, Nabokov and Balthus, Guy Davenport, Donald Bar­thelme, Raymond Carver, David Mamet, and Sam Shepard.
Main Description
The cultural rate of exchange cheats both sides of the Atlantic, leaving first-rate Eu ropean writers unknown in America, ex cellent American authors unread outside their native shores. Through these 13 essays by European critics, Chenetier seeks to remedy this, to encourage the cultural exchange between American and European writers. The au thors discussed are living innovators, the critics contemporary and diverse. The es sayists were asked to write as idiosyncratic a piece as they could think of, to do it with no holds barred, to indulge their particular critical manias or preferences, and to do so on the subject of their choice." The book is divided into two parts, Part 1 providing a general European view of American literature today. The essays in Part 2 focus on individual au thors--Walker Percy, William Gaddis and Gilbert Sorrentino, Nabokov and Balthus, Guy Davenport, Donald Bar thelme, Raymond Carver, David Mamet, and Sam Shepard.
Main Description
The cultural rate of exchange cheats both sides of the Atlantic, leaving first-rate Eu­ropean writers unknown in America, ex­cellent American authors unread outside their native shores. Through these 13 essays by European critics, Chenetier seeks to remedy this, to encourage the cultural exchange between American and European writers. The au­thors discussed are living innovators, the critics contemporary and diverse. The es­sayists were asked to write as idiosyncratic a piece as they could think of, to do it with no holds barred, to indulge their particular critical manias or preferences, and to do so on the subject of their choice." The book is divided into two parts, Part 1 providing a general European view of American literature today. The essays in Part 2 focus on individual au­thorsWalker Percy, William Gaddis and Gilbert Sorrentino, Nabokov and Balthus, Guy Davenport, Donald Bar­thelme, Raymond Carver, David Mamet, and Sam Shepard.
Table of Contents
Wide Anglesp. 1
The Real Thing Notes on an American Strategyp. 3
Modernism/Postmodernism Continuities of a "Split" Repertoire of Narrative Themes and Strategiesp. 15
Yours Faithfully, the Authorp. 29
The Author and the Reader in the Textp. 45
Figure and Ground in Modern American Poetryp. 60
Applied Clinometricsp. 75
The Exile of Binx Bolling Walker Percy's Moviegoerp. 77
The Energy of an Absence Perfection as Useful Fiction in the Novels of Gaddis and Sorrentinop. 105
Between Latency and Knowledge Figures of Preinitiation in Nabokov and Balthusp. 125
"An Exact Precession" Leonardo, Gertrude, and Guy Davenport's Da Vinci's Bicyclep. 145
On the Pertinaciousness of the Father, the Son, and the Subject The Case of Donald Barthelmep. 153
Living On/Off the "Reserve" Performance, Interrogation, and Negativity in the Works of Raymond Carverp. 164
David Mamet, a Virtuoso of Invectivep. 191
Sam Shepard Word and Imagep. 208
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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