Catalogue


Almost chosen people : oblique biographies in the American grain /
Michael Zuckerman.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1993.
description
x, 315 p.
ISBN
0520066510 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1993.
isbn
0520066510 (alk. paper)
general note
"A Centennial book"--P.
catalogue key
3133606
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
Few historians are bold enough to go after America's sacred cows in their very own pastures. But Michael Zuckerman is no ordinary historian, and this collection of his essays is no ordinary book. In his effort to remake the meaning of the American tradition, Zuckerman takes the entire sweep of American history for his province. The essays in this collection, including two never before published and a new autobiographical introduction, range from early New England settlements to the hallowed corridors of modern Washington. Among his subjects are Puritans and Southern gentry, Benjamin Franklin and Benjamin Spock, P. T. Barnum and Ronald Reagan. Collecting scammers and scoundrels, racists and rebels, as well as the purest genius, he writes to capture the unadorned American character. Recognized for his energy, eloquence, and iconoclasm, Zuckerman is known for provoking--and sometimes almost seducing--historians into rethinking their most cherished assumptions about the American past. Now his many fans, and readers of every persuasion, can newly appreciate the distinctive talents of one of America's most powerful social critics.
Unpaid Annotation
Few historians are bold enough to go after America's sacred cows in their very own pastures. But Michael Zuckerman is no ordinary historian, and this collection of his essays is no ordinary book.In his effort to remake the meaning of the American tradition, Zuckerman takes the entire sweep of American history for his province. The essays in this collection, including two never before published and a new autobiographical introduction, range from early New England settlements to the hallowed corridors of modern Washington. Among his subjects are Puritans and Southern gentry, Benjamin Franklin and Benjamin Spock, P. T. Barnum and Ronald Reagan. Collecting scammers and scoundrels, racists and rebels, as well as the purest genius, he writes to capture the unadorned American character.Recognized for his energy, eloquence, and iconoclasm, Zuckerman is known for provoking--and sometimes almost seducing--historians into rethinking their most cherished assumptions about the American past. Now his many fans, and,readers of every persuasion, can newly appreciate the distinctive talents of one of America's most powerful social critics.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
The Fabrication of Identity in Early Americap. 21
The Social Context of Democracy in Massachusettsp. 55
Pilgrims in the Wilderness: Community, Modernity, and the Maypole at Merry Mountp. 77
The Family Life of William Byrdp. 97
The Selling of the Self: From Franklin to Barnump. 145
The Power of Blackness: Thomas Jefferson and the Revolution in St. Dominguep. 175
The Nursery Tales of Horatio Algerp. 219
Faith, Hope, Not Much Charity: The Optimistic Epistemology of Lewis Mumfordp. 239
Dr. Spock: The Confidence Manp. 260
Ronald Reagan, Charles Beard, and the Constitution: The Uses of Enchantmentp. 288
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem