Catalogue


Gender, slavery, and law in colonial India /
Indrani Chatterjee.
imprint
New Delhi : Oxford University Press, c1999.
description
xii, 286 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0195641817
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Delhi : Oxford University Press, c1999.
isbn
0195641817
catalogue key
3126137
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [249]-278) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-03:
Chatterjee examines the processes by which slavery contributed to the constitution of the family and kinship in colonial India and was then erased from the colonial record by East India Company (EIC) policies. The author uses evidence from the household of the Nizamat of Murshidabad to get behind colonial definitions of slavery in an attempt to understand ways in which slaves functioned in the 19th century. She shows, for example, that recorded sales of "sons/daughters" were transactions of people who were already slaves, as were "gifts" of daughters to Brahmin priests. Chatterjee proves the existence of slavery, studies the principle around which the household (polity) was organized, investigates "marriage" politics, shows how Company policies and definitions enhanced conflict within the Nizamat family, and concludes that specific legal statements of the EIC, which some historians have understood as abolitionist, were really measures to consolidate masters' control over their slaves. This is an important book that could be greatly enhanced by defining terms, eliminating many abstruse constructions, and providing a glossary. Most useful to graduate students and researchers in South Asian colonial history. D. L. White; Appalachian State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Chatterjee's study...offers new understanding of the place of the eunuch and the harem in the milieu of governance....[She] presents complex themes clearly and articulately. Her research in company and Indian records is deep and broad....her work is erudite and her arguments highly plausible."-- History
'Chatterjee successfully challenges the hitherto widespread assumption that slave holding in South Asia involves only the adult male.'Internationales Asienforum, Vol.31, November 2000
'Chatterjee successfully challenges the hitherto widespread assumptionthat slave holding in South Asia involves only the adult male.'Internationales Asienforum, Vol.31, November 2000
'Indrani Chatterjee's study is highly commendable in that she sheds, for the first time, some light on a hitherto completely neglected aspect of Indian history.'Internationales Asienforum, Vol.31, November 2000
'Indrani Chatterjee's study is highly commendable in that she sheds, forthe first time, some light on a hitherto completely neglected aspect of Indianhistory.'Internationales Asienforum, Vol.31, November 2000
"Chatterjee's study...offers new understanding of the place of the eunuch and the harem in the milieu of governance....[She] presents complex themes clearly and articulately. Her research in company and Indian records is deep and broad....her work is erudite and her arguments highly plausible."--History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2000
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Summaries
Long Description
This volume shows that slaves acquired by some ruling households were incorporated into patterns of kinship. Colonial abolitionist measures did not even try to release these slaves; they restructured ideologies of marriage and succession instead and eroded the status of slave-descended members over time.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
List of Nazims
Introduction: Searching for Slaves in Indian History
Kinship and Kinlessness in the Nizamat of Murshidabad
Making and Becoming Kin
Slaves, Wealth and Inheritance
Legal Complicities: Transactions in Slaves and Company Regulation
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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