Catalogue


London crowds in the reign of Charles II : propaganda and politics from the Restoration until the exclusion crisis /
Tim Harris.
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1987.
description
xiv, 264 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 24 cm. --
ISBN
0521326230
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1987.
isbn
0521326230
general note
Based on the author's thesis (Ph. D.).
Includes index.
catalogue key
3085957
 
Bibliography: p. 229-255.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1988-07:
Harris challenges current assumptions on the political views of the Restoration London mob while offering insightful opinions on the nature of crowds. Although a majority of Londoners probably welcomed Charles II's restoration, thwarted expectations-especially among Nonconformists-created a vertically divided political culture in greater London. After discussing earlier examples of politically motivated mob actions, Harris analyzes the London crowds during and after the Exclusion Crisis. In contrast to John Miller's The Glorious Revolution (1983) and John Stevenson's Popular Disturbances in England, 1700-1870 (1979), Harris's book argues that London crowds during the Popish Plot were not exclusively Whig; Tories also had crowd support. The successful anti-Exclusionist policy of the crown after 1681, depending, as it did in London, on considerable popular cooperation, reflected widespread acceptance of the argument that Tory Anglicanism rather than Whig Nonconformity provided a better means to counter Franco-Popish attacks on English liberties. Harris's narrative demonstrates that crowds could on occasion be spontaneous manifestations of political opinion; at other times they could be the result of elite manipulation. Finally, Harris warns against reifying crowds, for the crowds he observes were neither homogenous nor continuous. A useful book with good notes and an excellent bibliography. Upper-division undergraduates and above.-C.L. Hamilton, Simon Fraser University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1988
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Attractively illustrated with polemical contemporary engravings, London Crowds demonstrates clearly the value of bringing together both high and low activity into a truly integrated social history of politics, and sheds important new light not just on urban agitation but on the nature of late-Stuart party conflict.
Description for Library
This study of the political attitudes of ordinary Londoners during the reign of Charles II examines not only the manifestations of public opinion - for example, riot and demonstration - but also the manner of its formation - religious experience, economic activity, and exposure to mass political propaganda. Professor Harris shows to be misleading the conventional view, that the whigs enjoyed the support of the London masses, and the tories were essentially anti-populist. Both sides had public support during the exclusion crisis, and this division stemmed from fundamental religious tensions within London political culture, dating back to 1660 and before.
Main Description
This study of the political attitudes of ordinary Londoners during the reign of Charles II examines not only the manifestations of public opinion - for example, riot and demonstration - but also the manner of its formation - religious experience, economic activity, and exposure to mass political propaganda. Professor Harris shows to be misleading the conventional view, that the whigs enjoyed the support of the London masses, and the tories were essentially anti-populist. Both sides had public support during the exclusion crisis, and this division stemmed from fundamental religious tensions within London political culture, dating back to 1660 and before. Attractively illustrated with polemical contemporary engravings, London Crowds demonstrates clearly the value of bringing together both high and low activity into a truly integrated social history of politics, and sheds important new light not just on urban agitation but on the nature of late-Stuart party conflict.
Table of Contents
List of illustrations
Acknowledgements
List of abbreviations
Approaches to the crowd
Reconstructing the political culture of the people
The people and the restoration
The problem of religion
Whig mass propaganda during the exclusion crisis
The tory response
Crowd politics and exclusion
The economics of crowd politics
A divided society
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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