Catalogue


The rise of modern police and the European state system from Metternich to the Second World War /
Hsi-huey Liang.
imprint
Cambridge, [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
description
xiii, 345 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521430224
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1992.
isbn
0521430224
general note
Includes bibliographical references and index.
catalogue key
3063232
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-07:
Liang, an authority on the Berlin police force during the Weimar era, makes a foray into a little-studied subject matter. His treatment of modern policing from an international perspective is valuable both for its detailing of research obstacles and for his own tentative attempt to give a structure to study of the problem. To define the "modern police," Liang relies on a scheme of periodization within which to compare the differing policing styles in France, Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. Russian influence on European police forces is treated peripherally but adds another useful comparative dimension. The British police, who exerted no such influence, are left out. Liang defines the terminology and then proceeds to fill in the details of his structure, tracing developments from the post-Napoleonic era, the influence exercised by increasingly competitive European states, failed attempts at international police cooperation, and, finally, the baneful effects of the rise of totalitarian systems. This ambitious study rests on the resources of "underworked," i.e., disorganized, archives and should be prized as a courageous introductory investigation. Advanced undergraduate; graduate; faculty; professional. R. S. Levy; University of Illinois at Chicago
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a must not only for students of the police, but also for social and political historians looking for bridges between these fields." George C. Browder, Central European History
"He has roamed through mountains of sources and a careful reading of his detailed list of archival files is in itself an education in the history of the European police." German Studies Review
"Liang's research efforts are impressive. He has mined important archival sources exhaustively to weave a skillful narrative." The Historian
"This admirably researched, cogently developed, and broadly focused study deserves the attention of all historians of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe." Jonathan W. Daly, Journal of Modern History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1993
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book is a comprehensive history of Continental police systems, especially in the context of political and diplomatic history. It culminates in the clash between the movement toward international police collaboration and the alternative of Continental police hegemony by one power, as attempted by Nazi Germany.
Description for Library
The Rise of the Modern Police re-examines the diplomatic history of modern Europe as a succession of mounting police problems linking the countries of the Continent through their growing dependency on one another for domestic order, security, and social progress. It culminates in the clash between the movement toward international police collaboration and the alternative of Continental police hegemony by one power, as attempted by Nazi Germany. This book is the first comprehensive history of Continental police systems, especially in the context of political and diplomatic history.
Main Description
The Rise of the Modern Police and the European State System from Metternich to the Second World War re-examines the diplomatic history of Europe from the 1820s to World War II as a succession of mounting police problems linking the countries of the Continent through their growing dependency on one another for domestic order, security, and social progress. It culminates in the clash between movement toward international police collaboration and the alternative of Continental police hegemony by one power, as attempted by Nazi Germany between the late 1930s and 1945. This book is the first comprehensive history of Continental police systems, especially in the context of political and diplomatic history.
Main Description
The Rise of the Modern Police and the European State System from Metternich to the Second World War re-examines the diplomatic history of Europe from the 1820s to World War II as a succession of mounting police problems linking the countries of the Continent through their growing dependency on one another for domestic order, security, and social progress. It culminates in the clash between the movement toward international police collaboration and the alternative of Continental police hegemony by one power, as attempted by Nazi Germany between the late 1930s and 1945. This book is the first comprehensive history of Continental police systems, especially in the context of political and diplomatic history.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
Preface
Introduction: How do we define modern police?
Five national police styles in response to popular unrest in the nineteenth century
Modern police and the conduct of foreign policy: the French police and the recovery of France after 1871
International police collaboration from the 1870s to 1914
War and revolution, 1914-1922
The threat of totalitarianism: Nazi Germany's bid for European hegemony
Epilogue
List of archival
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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