Catalogue


The conquest of the Karankawas and the Tonkawas, 1821-1859 /
Kelly F. Himmel.
imprint
College Station, Tex. : Texas A&M University Press, c1999.
description
xvi, 192 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0890968675
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
College Station, Tex. : Texas A&M University Press, c1999.
isbn
0890968675
catalogue key
3038585
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [169]-185) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2000-03:
Himmel's book is a case study in historical sociology that examines the interactions between two American Indian tribes in Texas--the Karankawa on the Gulf Coast and the Tonkawa in central Texas--and the Anglo-Texan settlers. From 1821 to 1859 Anglo-Texan colonization resulted in the Indians' loss of independence. Anglo-Texans waged a "war of extermination" against the Karankawa but, in contrast, allied themselves with the Tonkawa, who were an effective buffer against Plains tribes north of the Texas settlements. The author explains the difference in Anglo-Texan relations with the two tribes by examining the Western concept of "conquest" within the framework of world-system theory. The book includes historical and cultural summaries of both the Karankawa and Tonkawa that are based on extensive archival and library research, but it is not primarily a history of these tribes. Instead, it is an exercise in applying social science theory to Native American history. The book lacks maps or other illustrative material that would help readers follow the detailed accounts of historical events. Recommended for graduate students and professionals in history, sociology, anthropology, and related disciplines. D. R. Parks; Indiana University-Bloomington
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Choice, March 2000
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
IN 1821, ALTHOUGH SPAIN CLAIMED what is now Texas, American Indian groups occupied it. Less than forty years later, they had been largely displaced, and their subsistence economy, supplemented by raiding and trade, had been replaced by an Anglo-Texan agricultural economy linked to a rapidly expanding and industrializing capitalist system.For the Karankawas and the Tonkawas, the period from 1821 to 1859 was particularly devastating. Once thriving communities, the Karankawas survived only as scattered individuals after a small remnant on the banks of the Rio Grande was massacred, and the few remaining Tonkawas had been pushed across the Red River into Indian Territory.Kelly F. Himmel has written an account of this conquest that gives new understanding of the processes. He explores geopolitical and economic factors, as well as the role of individual and collective human actors and the effects of cultural orientations of the conquered and conquering groups toward each other.Among his findings is the importance of geopolitical location. During the early Spanish period, the coastal Karankawas offered a buffer against French, English, and Anglo-American intrusion into Texas. Later, during the early days of Anglo-American settlement, the Tonkawas provided a barrier against the Wichitas and Comanches. For both groups, when the threat to their European-origin allies ended, so did the alliances. In considering the social construction of the "other, " Himmel describes how early trade patterns predisposed Anglo-Texans to characterize Karankawas as cannibals, while viewing the Tonkawas, for whom much stronger evidence of cannibalism exists, as harmless beggars and petty thieves.Through the detailed analysis of factors such as these, Himmel not only portrays a period in the history of these two peoples that has been largely unstudied, but also offers lucid explanations of the framework of Anglo-Texan conques
Main Description
In 1821, although Spain claimed what is now Texas, American Indian groups occupied it. Less than forty years later, they had been largely displaced, and their subsistence economy, supplemented by raiding and trade, had been replaced by an Anglo-Texan agricultural economy linked to a rapidly expanding and industrializing capitalist system. For the Karankawas and the Tonkawas, the period from 1821 to 1859 was particularly devastating. Once thriving communities, the Karankawas survived only as scattered individuals after a small remnant on the banks of the Rio Grande was massacred, and the few remaining Tonkawas had been pushed across the Red River into Indian Territory. Kelly Himmel has written an account of this conquest that gives new understanding of the processes. He explores geopolitical and economic factors, as well as the role of individual and collective human actors and the effects of cultural orientations of the conquered and conquering groups toward each other. Among his findings is the importance of geopolitical location. During the early Spanish period, the coastal Karankawas offered a buffer against French, English, and Anglo-American intrusion into Texas. Later, during the early days of Anglo-American settlement, the Tonkawas provided a barrier against the Wichitas and Comanches. For both groups, when the threat to their European-origin allies ended, so did the alliances. In considering the social construction of the "other," he describes how early trade patterns predisposed Anglo-Texans to characterize Karankawas as cannibals, while viewing the Tonkawas, for whom much stronger evidence of cannibalism exists, as harmless beggars and petty thieves. Through the detailed analysis of factors such as these, Himmel not only portrays a period in the history of these two peoples that has been largely unstudied, but also offers lucid explanations of the framework of Anglo-Texan conquest. Historians, sociologists, and anthropologists will find new insight and information in this valuable addition to the literature on Texas Indians and Texas history.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Texas in 1821: Prelude to Conquestp. 3
The Political Economy of Mexican Texas, 1821-35: Initiation of Conquestp. 37
The Political Economy of the Republic of Texas, 1836-45: Negotiation of Conquestp. 62
The Incorporation of Texas into the Unitedn States, 1846-59: Consolidation of Conquestp. 93
Conclusionsp. 124
Notesp. 145
Bibliographyp. 169
Indexp. 187
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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